dermatosparaxis

dermatosparaxis

(dĕr″mă-tō-spă-răk′sĭs) [″ + Gr. sparassein, to tear]
Loose, sagging, fragile, and easily bruised skin. When it is caused by a deficiency of procollagen I, it is responsible for a rare variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Dermatosparaxis

Skin fragility caused by abnormal collagen.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To date, six underlying types of disease have been identified and are categorised as follows: classical (formerly type I/II), hypermobility (formerly type III), vascular (formerly type IV), kyphoscoliosis (formerly type VI), arthrochalasia (formerly type VIIA/VIIB), and dermatosparaxis (formerly type VIIC) [1].
The various types include--classic; hypermobility; vascular; kyphoscoliosis; arthrochalasia; and dermatosparaxis. The vascular type (EDS IV) is rare (<4%) and is caused by mutation of the type III procollagen (COL3A1) gene that results in fragile medium and large arteries.
With recent developments and increased medical expertise, a simplified classifica-tion of EDS has been revised into six major types namely Classical, Hypermobility, Vascular, Ky-phoscoliosis, Arthroclasia, and Dermatosparaxis.6 Kyphoscoliosis type of EDS (Type VI in previous clas-sification) is attributed to a deficiency in lysyl hy-droxylase (LH), the enzyme that hydroxylates spe-cific lysine residues in the collagen molecule to form hydroxylysines with 2 important functions.
The six major types of EDS are (a) classical type, (b) hypermobility type, (c) vascular type, (d) kyphoscoliosis type, (e) arthrochalasia type, and (f) dermatosparaxis type (Beighton et al., 1998).