dermatophytosis

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Related to dermatophytoses: pityriasis versicolor

dermatophytosis

 [der″mah-to-fi-to´sis]
1. any superficial fungal infection caused by a dermatophyte and involving the stratum corneum of the skin, hair, and nails, including onychomycosis and the various forms of tinea. Called also epidermomycosis and epidermophytosis.

der·ma·to·phy·to·sis

(der'mă-tō-fī-tō'sis),
An infection of the hair, skin, or nails caused by any one of the dermatophytes. The lesions may occur at any site on the body and, on the skin, are characterized by erythema, small papular vesicles, fissures, and scaling. Common sites of infection are the feet (tinea pedis), nails (onychomycosis), and scalp (tinea capitis). Compare: dermatomycosis.

dermatophytosis

(dûr′mə-tō′fī-tō′sĭs)
n.
A fungal infection of the skin, especially athlete's foot.
A skin infection by mould-like fungi known as dermatophytes—e.g., Trichophyton rubrum, T mentagrophytes, Microsporium canis, M gypsum, rarely also Epidermophyton spp; in children, T canis is the most common agent
DiffDx Nonfungal dermatopathies—e.g., erythema annulare, ‘herald patch’ of pityriasis rosea, atopic dermatitis, other dermatitides
Management Most resolve without therapy—otherwise, miconazole; if severe, griseofulvin

der·ma·to·phy·to·sis

(dĕr'mă-tō-fī-tō'sis)
An infection of the hair, skin, or nails caused by any one of the dermatophytes. The lesions are characterized by erythema, small papular vesicles, fissures, and scaling. Common sites of infection are the feet (tinea pedis), nails (onychomycosis), and scalp (tinea capitis).
Compare: dermatomycosis

dermatophytosis

A general term for fungus infection of the skin, often called TINEA or ‘ringworm’.
References in periodicals archive ?
Epizootic and epidemic dermatophytose outbreaks caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes from rabbits in Portugal, 2015.
Zoophilic and geophilic dermatophytoses among farmers and non-farmers in Eastern Poland.
The Greeks referred to dermatophytoses as herpes (to creep around) and the Romans thought the disease resembled the larval stage of the worm Tinea (which is Latin for worm).
Clinico-microbiological study of dermatophytoses. Indian J.
In a previous study on superficial dermatophytoses in Asia done by KJ Rhim and JH Kim in 1978, it was found that 'the age group of 20-29 years shows the highest incidence.' [16]
Oral antifungal agents are generally considered safe in the treatment of skin dermatophytoses. In systemic review of trials of oral antifungal agents in the treatment of tinea pedis, the most commonly identified adverse events were gastrointestinal complaints such as diarrhea or nausea, headaches, and skin complaints.
I was asked to review the potential use of the newer antifungal agents for the various superficial dermatophytoses. With the exceptions of onychomycosis and tinea capitis, which do require oral therapy to achieve cure, I suggested neither that systemic antifungals were the drugs of choice nor first-line therapy for garden-variety tinea.
Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton are the genera implicated to cause dermatophytoses. These dermatophytes are closely related filamentous fungi and cause the disease by virtue of their unique ability to degrade keratin and invade the skin and its appendages.
Conclusion: Tinea corporis was the commonest clinical type of all dermatophytoses. Trichophyton rubrum was the most common isolate, thus concluding that it is the most common cause of superficial dermatophytic infection.
Among the fungal infections, various dermatophytoses (22.5%) were more commonly noted, followed by candidal infections (12%), (Figure 1).
Dermatophytoses refer to superficial fungal infection of keratinised tissues- skin, hair and nail caused by keratinophilic dermatophytes.
Dermatophytoses as occupational dermatoses in industrialized countries-Report of two cases from Munich.