dermatophyte

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dermatophyte

 [der´mah-to-fīt″]
a fungus parasitic upon the skin, usually a species of Microsporum, Epidermophyton, or Trichophyton. Called also cutaneous fungus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

der·ma·to·phyte

(der'mă-tō-fīt),
A fungus that causes superficial infections of the skin, hair, and/or nails, that is, keratinized tissues. Species of Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton are regarded as dermatophytes, but causative agents of tinea versicolor, tinea nigra, and cutaneous candidiasis are not so classified.
[dermato- + G. phyton, plant]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dermatophyte

(dûr-măt′ə-fīt′, dûr′mə-tə-)
n.
Any of various parasitic fungi that cause infections of the skin, hair, or nails.

der·mat′o·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dermatophyte

Mycology A fungus—Epidermophyton spp, Microsporum spp, Trichophyton spp, that primarily causes superficial infections of skin, hair, and fingernails
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

der·ma·to·phyte

(dĕr-matŏ-fīt)
A fungus that causes superficial infections of the skin, hair, and nails, i.e., keratinized tissues. Species of Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton are regarded as dermatophytes, but causative agents of tinea versicolor, tinea nigra, and cutaneous candidiasis are not so classified.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Dermatophyte

A type of fungus that causes diseases of the skin, including tinea or ringworm.
Mentioned in: KOH Test
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

der·ma·to·phyte

(dĕr-matŏ-fīt)
Fungus that causes superficial infections of the skin, hair, and nails.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
As per the studies conducted by various authors, dermatophytic infection of skin is more common in males than females and the higher incidence in males is presumably due to more physical activity and increased perspiration in a hot humid climate of tropical countries.
The phase III pivotal trial protocol included patients between the ages of 18 and 70 years, with distal subungual onychomycosis of at least one great toenail (target nail) and positive KOH examination and culture for dermatophytic onychomycosis.
Anti dermatophytic therapy--prospects for the discovery of new drugs from natural products.
New York, NY, February 03, 2016 --(PR.com)-- Persistence Market Research (PMR) delivers key insights on the global dermatophytic onychomycosis therapeutics Market in its latest report titled "Global Market Study on Dermatophytic Onychomycosis Therapeutics (DOT): North America Expected to Account for Maximum Market Share by 2021."
Characterization and evaluation of anti dermatophytic of the essential oil from Artimisia nilagirica leaves growing wild in Nilgiris.
According to "Dermatophytic Onychomycosis --Epidemiology Forecast to 2022," the number of nail fungus cases in the United States will rise from 31.7 million this year to 37.7 million in 2022, a 19.1% increase.
Tinea pedis or athletes foot is a dermatophytic fungus infection involving the feet or toes.
Tinea or dermatophytosis is a superficial fungal infection caused by invasion of keratinised tissues such as hair, nails and corneal layer of the skin by filamentous fungi called dermatophytes.1 Tinea capitis is dermatophytic infestation of hair and scalp.
It is now clear that IL-17-dependent recruitment of neutrophils and secretion of antimicrobial peptides are crucial for cutaneous protection against dermatophytic infections and Candida albicans [47,49-51].
The abenquines show inhibitory activity against bacteria, dermatophytic fungi, and phosphodiesterase type 4b [33].