dermatofibroma

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Related to dermatofibromas: keratosis pilaris, cherry angioma, lipomas

dermatofibroma

 [der″mah-to-fi-bro´mah]
a fibrous tumorlike nodule of the skin, usually on the extremities and especially the legs. Its etiology is not known, but it is most likely a neoplastic disorder. Although it is benign, itching and pain can be a source of severe discomfort.

der·ma·to·fi·bro·ma

(der'mă'tō-fī-brō'mă),
A slowly growing benign skin nodule consisting of poorly demarcated cellular fibrous tissue enclosing collapsed capillaries, with scattered hemosiderin-pigmented and lipid macrophages. The following terms are considered by some to be synonymous with, and by others to be varieties of, dermatofibroma: sclerosing hemangioma (2), fibrous histiocytoma, nodular subepidermal fibrosis.

benign fibrous histiocytoma

A benign tumour composed of primitive mesenchymal cells (macrophages or histiocytes) seen in the skin and soft tissues of the legs of young to middle-aged patients, more commonly women, usually in relation to skeletal muscle.
 
Management
Excision.

der·ma·to·fi·bro·ma

(dĕr'mă-tō-fī-brō'mă)
A slowly growing benign skin nodule consisting of poorly demarcated cellular fibrous tissue enclosing collapsed capillaries, with scattered hemosiderin-pigmented and lipid macrophages. The following terms are considered by some to be synonymous with, and by others to be varieties of, dermatofibroma: sclerosing hemangioma, fibrous histiocytoma, nodular subepidermal fibrosis.
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DERMATOFIBROMA
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DERMATOFIBROMA

dermatofibroma

(der?ma-to-fi-bro'ma) [? + L. fibra, fiber, + Gr. oma, tumor]
A firm but freely movable benign skin nodule, often found on the lower extremities.
See: illustration; dimple signillustration
References in periodicals archive ?
Epidermal basaloid cell hyperplasia overlying dermatofibromas. Am J Dermatopathol.
Combined dermatofibroma: co-existence of two or more variant patterns in a single lesion.
Las lesiones superficiales como los nevus y dermatofibromas, son susceptibles de la infiltracion angular.
Maurer suggested performing a biopsy to distinguish KS from benign dermatofibromas. KS should be followed closely for 3-4 months, checking CD4 levels and HIV viral load.
Maurer suggested performing a biopsy to confirm KS, which can be confused with benign dermatofibromas. KS should be followed closely for 3-4 months, checking CD4 levels and HIV viral load.
Pigmented Lesions of the Skin covers twenty-five subjects based on pigmented cutaneous lesions including acquired nevi, congenital nevi, seborrheic keratosis, dermatofibromas, malignant melanomas, and many others.
Other skin growths, such as wart-like keratoses (that may be flat or elevated), may tend to itch or be unsightly; others, called dermatofibromas, may result from bites or other skin injuries that produce scarlike tissue of various colors.
(110) However, MITF is not specific, and staining has also been reported in neurofibromas, dermatofibromas, AFX, leiomyosarcomas, schwannomas, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, solitary fibrous tumor, giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath, dermal scars, and granular cell tumors.
* Dermatofibromas (DFs) are common benign skin lesions that typically appear as pinkto brown-colored firm nodules that represent a localized response to skin injury and inflammation.
The clinical and microscopic manifestation of SHML should be differentiated from malignant lymphoreticular neoplasias, such as Hodgkin's disease and monocytic leukemia, histiocytosis, rhinoscleroma, tuberculosis, juvenile xanthogranuloma, dermatofibromas, and eosinophilic granuloma, among others.
However, HHV8 is not entirely limited to KS and has been detected in some angiosarcomas, hemangiomas, and dermatofibromas. (28) LNA-1 immunohistochemistry is favored over polymerase chain reaction detection of HHV8 in the evaluation of problematic vascular proliferations because contaminating mononuclear inflammatory cells may also harbor this herpesvirus, especially in HIV-positive patients.
According to a study of 1215 biopsies conducted in a primary care population, over 80% of biopsied lesions were benign and included nevi, seborrheic keratoses, cysts, dermatofibromas, fibrous histiocytomas, and polyps or skin tags.