dermatochalasis


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der·ma·to·cha·la·sis

(der'mă-tō-kă-lā'sis),
A congenital or acquired condition characterized by deficient elastic fibers of the skin, which may hang in folds; vascular anomalies may be present; inheritance is either autosomal dominant or recessive, the latter sometimes in association with pulmonary emphysema and diverticula of the alimentary tract or bladder. The dominant form is caused by mutation in the elastin gene (ELN) on 7q. There is also an X-linked form that is due to mutation in the Menkes gene (MNK), encoding copper-transporting ATPase on Xq.
[dermato- + G. chalasis, a loosening]

der·ma·to·cha·la·sis

(dĕr'mă-tō-kal'ă-sis)
An acquired condition characterized by undue looseness or pendulousness of the eyelid skin due to degeneration of elastic fibers.
Synonym(s): cutis laxa [TA] , pachydermatocele, blepharochalasis.
[dermato- + G. chalasis, a loosening]

dermatochalasis

(dĕr″mă-tō-kă-lā′sĭs) [ dermato- + Gr. chalasis, relaxation]
Loose or sagging soft tissue in the eyelids, esp. the upper eyelid. It results from loss of tissue elasticity and is more prevalent in older people.

dermatochalasis

A condition in which there is a redundancy of the skin of the upper eyelids. It is often associated with a protrusion of fat through a defective orbital septum. The condition occurs usually in old people. The excess skin may cause pseudoptosis. In severe cases it may obstruct vision. Treatment is surgical. Syn. ptosis adiposa; ptosis atrophica. See blepharochalasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dermatochalasis surgery [degrees] Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose 4.4.2.
Ascher's or Laffer-Ascher syndrome was first described in 1920 by Ascher.1 The disease can be inherited but majority are idiopathic in nature.2 It characteristically presents as a triad of double upper lip, blepharochalasis, and a nontoxic thyroid enlargement is present in this disorder.3 Many conditions can simulate this disorder including hereditary angioedema, early dermatochalasis, acquired cutis laxa and variants of granulomatous cheilitis.4 There are no published case reports of Ascher's syndrome from Nepal till date.
The histologic findings are prominent minor salivary glands and a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate.5 The differential diagnosis includes hereditary angioedema, early dermatochalasis, acquired cutis laxa and variants of granulomatous cheilitis.
Typical clinical findings in aponeurotic ptosis may include good levator muscle function, deep upper eyelid sulcus, and upper eyelid dermatochalasis [11].
The clinical examination revealed periocular dermatochalasis, lower eyelid laxity, dry eye disease, chronic blepharitis, chronic conjunctivitis, and superficial punctate keratopathy.
His vision deteriorated until he was diagnosed with ocular hypertension, open-angle glaucoma, and dermatochalasis.
Postoperative problems included dry eye symptoms (6/144 patients), contour abnormalities in 12 lids, and dermatochalasis in 10 lids.
There was no recurrence but one superior eyelid entropium and dermatochalasis is seen during followup with the patients.
An assessment of facial asymmetry should include brow ptosis, dermatochalasis, skin laxity, oral commissure incompetence, and ocular exposure.
Ptosis is often diagnostically confused with dermatochalasis, where only excess skin hangs down (Figure 1), as opposed to downward displacement of the actual eyelid margin, as seen in ptosis.
dermatochalasis) may produce a superior artefactual visual field defect (Figure 2); (24) absolute loss (thresholds of 0db) is certainly indicative of this possibility, (25) especially if bilateral, whilst occurrence in the second eye is suggestive of fatigue (see later).