dermabrasion


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Related to dermabrasion: chemical peel, Microdermabrasion

dermabrasion

 [derm″ah-bra´zhun]
planing of the skin done by mechanical means such as sandpaper or wire brushes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

der·ma·bra·sion

(der'mă-brā'zhŭn),
Operative procedure to efface acne scars or pits; performed with sandpaper, rotating abrasive drums, wire brushes, or other materials.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dermabrasion

(dûr′mə-brā′zhən)
n.
A surgical cosmetic procedure in which the facial skin is abraded with fine sandpaper or wire brushes in order to diminish the appearance of wrinkles, discoloration, scars, and other blemishes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dermabrasion

A procedure in which a high-speed rotary wheel with a roughened surface (similar to fine-grained sandpaper) is used to abrade the skin which, once healed, is usually firmer and smoother, but may have residual pigment changes.

Indications
Extensive solar damage, skin wrinkling, to improve texture of pockmarked skin caused by severe acne or chickenpox.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dermabrasion

Dermatology A technique in which a dermatome or abrading device is used to remove the epidermis and superficial dermis, allowing regeneration of the epithelium to occur from underlying adnexal structures–eg pilosebaceous unit; dermabrasion is used to treat postacne scarring, scars caused by surgery, trauma, or varicella; it may be used to treat actinic keratosis, nevi, rhinophyma, seborrheic hyperplasia, seborrheic keratosis, solar elastosis, tattoos Contraindication Radiodermatitis, as radiation damages adnexal structures and blood supply
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

der·ma·bra·sion

(dĕrm'ă-brā'zhŭn)
Operative procedure used to remove acne scars or pits performed with sandpaper, rotating wire brushes, or other abrasive materials.
Synonym(s): planing.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dermabrasion

A procedure in cosmetic plastic surgery in which rough or pitted skin is smoothed down, and its appearance improved, by sandpapering or by the use of other abrasive methods.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Dermabrasion

A technique for removing the upper layers of skin with planing wheels powered by compressed air.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also stated that superficial and focal dermabrasion "may also be safe when performed by a well-trained clinician" in a clinical setting.
"While focal dermabrasion and excisional techniques require more training, they also are very effective for certain prominent scars," he said.
When dermabrasion was first developed, it was used predominantly to improve scars resulting from acne, chicken pox, accidents or other disease.
* Dermabrasion can be performed on local areas of skin, such as a small scar; on larger zones, such as the cheeks or the area around the mouth; or on the entire face.
The researchers determined that evidence does not support the safety of mechanical dermabrasion or fully ablative laser surgeries for current or recent isotretinoin users.
The skyrocketing popularity of mass market dermabrasion products is related to fast-paced growth in the medical segment of skin care, suggests Lenka Contreras, vice president of the consumer products practice at market researcher Kline & Co.
New-product activity in the dermabrasion segment presents a microcosm of what is taking place in the category as a whole, with mass market shelves making room for dermabrasion kits from established skin care brands, niche suppliers and new entrants.
But the improvements leveled off when patients switched from weekly to monthly dermabrasion sessions, suggesting that weekly treatment with dermabrasion may be necessary to maintain an optimal effect, Dr.
It doesn't hurt compared to some dermabrasion treatments which use sand to blast theskin and there's no redness afterwards.
Among the new offerings are facial peels, dermabrasion kits and wrinkle-repair treatments, which are positioned as alternatives to Botox injections.
Dear Miriam I'M thinking of having dermabrasion. It seems much less radical than cosmetic surgery and I don't fancy going under the knife.
"Peeling, destructive dermabrasion, micro-abrasion and laser all belong to an era when our only option was to destroy offending skin marks and wrinkles," he explains.