derived character

derived character

a characteristic that is considerably altered from the ancestral condition.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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If the character changes and that variation is passed on to new species, the original form of the character is known as the "ancestral character state," whereas the new form is referred to as the "derived character state." For example, assume that a parent population of vertebrates had short limbs and gave rise to daughter species that had long limbs and short limbs.
Students begin with a materials-based problem set that introduces them to concepts of phylogenetic analysis, including homology, convergence, parsimony, and ancestral versus derived characters. The project concludes with students conducting a phylogenetic study on a set of vertebrate skeletons, primate skulls, or hominid skulls and then giving presentations comparing their findings with published results.
The position of the transbasal area of the embolus (TBE) provides a derived character state for the genus Notasteron (character 10/2).
Several papers argue that species are lineages and that derived character states are necessary to identify units of biodiversity.
Although her monograph predates modern phylogenetic methods, her results were summarized in tabulature form and included discussions of presumed ancestral and derived character states.
3; apomorphic refers to a derived character state and plesiomorphic to its ancestral counterpart), Coddington (1988) proposed that one could test the hypothesis of adaptive origin for a trait of interest simply by mapping the character states of sister taxa onto an independently derived cladogram.
robustus, exhibit a suite of uniquely derived characters relating to an extreme development of their teeth, especially premolars and molars, and jaws.
Two unique derived characters included in the analysis are shared by both species of Aleixus, one non-homoplastic and one homoplastic (Fig.
He said: 'The new hominid displays a unique combination of primitive and derived characters, suggesting a close relationship to the last common ancestor between humans and chimpanzees, suggesting him as a likely ancestor of all later hominids.'
This chiton retains a mixture of primitive and derived characters that together produce a novel mechanism of fertilization, which is represented on the cover.
Although the role of ancestor models in evolutionary theory is subject to debate (e.g., Archibald 1994), it is generally accepted that an ancestral taxon must lack uniquely derived characters. Given the billion or so years that have elapsed since mitochondria became established in eukaryotic cells, it is highly unlikely that any extant taxon will meet this criterion.