derivative

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de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv),
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
1. Relating to or producing derivation.
2. Something produced by modification of something preexisting.
3. Specifically, a chemical compound produced from another compound in one or more steps, as in replacement of H by an alkyl, acyl, or amino group.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·riv·a·tive

(dĕ-riv'ă-tiv)
Chemical compound that may be produced from another compound of similar structure in one or more steps.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Both in the political and academic arena, it became impossible now to dissociate East Indian identity from perceived notions of cultural retention, persistence of mores, and the discourses of derivativeness. In a curious turn of events, the colonial design was finally completed by the very act of dismantling the colonial apparatus.
Transforming Edgar Cayce's supposed power of prophecy, Cayce's sensitivity to Tommy Hilfiger's perfect derivativeness, and therefore the purity of his logo as advertisement, is what allows her to perform her various contracted jobs: she is hired by multinational conglomerates to test whether the logos for their new products will be effective.
(Halbwachs, 1997 [1950]: 130; translation mine) Standing firmly within a longstanding tradition that privileges the 'authenticity' of oral communication over the derivativeness of writing (Derrida, 1967), Halbwachs saw texts as second best to the 'living' and 'internal' memory carried by speech and supported by face-to-face communities.
On an outstanding figure in the constitution of French Orientalism in the nineteenth century, Said writes: "Renan was a figure in his own right neither of total originality nor of absolute derivativeness....
Comparing Avery to Dove, Arnold Friedman, Marsden Hartley (whom Avery painted more than once), and John Marin, Greenberg wrote: Fifteen years ago, reviewing one of his shows at Paul Rosenberg's in The Nation, while I admired his landscapes, I gave most of my space to the derivativeness of the figure pieces, that made up the bulk of the show, and if I failed to discern how much there was in these that was not Matisse, it was not only because of my own imperceptiveness, but also because the artist himself had contrived not to call enough attention to it....
Presumably Jacovides means that the derivativeness of the application of 'red' to objects is of a different order than that of the application of 'square' to objects.
"Authentic" designates those music, musicians, and musical experiences seen to be direct and honest, uncorrupted by commerce, trendiness, derivativeness, a lack of inspiration, and so on'.
Interviewed by the Toronto Star shortly after his release, he responded to a request for his personal political motto by (mis)quoting Georges Jacques Danton: "Audacity, audacity, still more audacity." (Ironically, the choice suggested caution and derivativeness rather than boldness; Buck had borrowed it from Lenin, who had borrowed it from Marx).
Haddad, who have maintained the journal's commitment to discriminate "between good and bad scholarship, between a version of the truth and an ideological fiction," as the founding editors promised, and "between originality and lackluster derivativeness."
Perhaps this happens as a result of his major defence of Gozzano against charges of massive plagiarism and derivativeness. Di Biagi conducts this defence with great finesse as well as scholarship, ultimately in terms of the essentially intertextual as well as factitious (fittizia) nature of literary art.
Participants used 11 distinct communication strategies when rendering into English the collocations and idiomatic expressions (e.g., avoidance, false collocation, overgeneralization, derivativeness, verbosity, and idiomacity).