pejorative

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pejorative

Medtalk Bad…real bad

pejorative

(pĭ-jawr′ă-tĭv) (pē″jă-rā′tĭv) [L. pejor, worse]
1. Tending to become or make worse.
2. Disparaging or belittling.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ethnic Turkish lawmaker's remarks were in response to Tsvetanov's derisive comment addressed at PM-hopeful Plamen Oresharki's proposal of a syntax professor, Mariana Georgieva- Bencheva, for Minister of Youth and Sports.
New Delhi, April 4 ( ANI ): Rubbishing the Punjab Police's contention that a village woman had to be thrashed and aggressively pushed around because she had used unparliamentary language and thrown her sandals at some of the policemen on duty, a derisive Supreme Court on Thursday described it as scrap that needed to be thrown into the dustbin, and mockingly said the concerned policemen should be given bravery medals for what they had done.
Stanley McChrystal who was forced to resign after derisive comments about the Obama administration and his aides were publilshed in the Rolling Stone magazine.
I enjoyed your insight into the many things that Slate is doing well, but I was perplexed by your somewhat derisive response to the Slate reader who took exception to so many podcasts.
Contempt is such a strong, negative, derisive emotion.
It's the sort of derisive snobbery that has smug, bss h pretentious twits sniggering at those who enjoy soaps, blockbuster movies and musicals.
Because the alternative is to spend life hearing gales of derisive laughter not realising it's all directed at you
Watson's derisive put-down came after Murdoch repeatedly denied he had seen any evidence of widespread criminality at the defunct Sunday newspaper.
Now they're 58g "and would barely merit a derisive snort from Marianne Faithful
On Sunday, the March 14 alliance held a massive rally in Beirut during which leaders from the group launched a derisive attack on the contentious arms of Hizbullah.
The cables released last month, which reveal blunt, sometimes derisive depictions of foreign governments and leaders, have been an embarrassment for Washington.
The case illustrates the "libel tourism" that has earned London the derisive appellation "a town called sue.