derealization


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Related to derealization: dissociation

derealization

 [de-re″al-ĭ-za´shun]
loss of sensation of the reality of one's surroundings; the feeling that something has happened, that the world has been changed and altered, that one is detached from one's environment. It is seen most frequently in schizophrenia. See also depersonalization.

de·re·al·i·za·tion

(dē-rē'ă-li-zā'shŭn),
An alteration in one's perception of the environment such that things that are ordinarily familiar seem strange, unreal, or two-dimensional.

derealization

Psychiatry An altered and unreal perception of things and objects in space/time, which may be accompanied by depersonalization. See Hallucination.

de·re·al·i·za·tion

(dē-rē'ă-lī-zā'shŭn)
An alteration in one's perception of the environment such that things that are ordinarily familiar seem strange, unreal, or two dimensional.

derealization

See DEPERSONALIZATION.

Derealization

A dissociative symptom in which the external environment is perceived as unreal.

Patient discussion about derealization

Q. If the lie is our truth & living the truth feels fake & unreal how do we persevere to the needed chang there's the real me, good & underdeveloped. there is the worldly me, challenged as all of us probably are. there is the addict me, afflicted half or more of my life, developed & strong. two out of three are tough odds to deal with...

A. the battle against your own self is harsh and there will be casualties. reality is based on your own definition of the world around you, but it also based on how the world defines you. this is your escape from the inner struggle- define yourself and your actions not by your own faulty judgment but by how the world and it's moral judge you.
good luck.

More discussions about derealization
References in periodicals archive ?
More than an emblem for the ways in which our culture both fetishizes and demonizes women as they gain personal and cultural authority, Julia's hedge witch body codifies the ways in which the non-punctual trauma of derealization warps conceptions of self and embodiment.
Late stage dementia contains emotional outbursts such as screaming and crying (loss of control), auditory hallucinations (tinnitus), a complete loss of reality (derealization), lack of sense of self (depersonalization), loss of bodily sensations related to elimination (abdominal distress), walking and balance (paresthesias/dizziness), shortness of breath (choking/chest discomfort), and in some cases, seizures (trembling or shaking).
The most efficient mechanisms of defence and self-control are derealization, de-personalization and dissociation.
Of the BSQ, the 15 items concerning bodily sensations (omitting the 2 items concerning derealization) were used to measure of attentional focus on the occurrence of bodily sensations when in a nervous or feared situation (e.g., heart palpitations, dizziness or sweating).
ARTISTIC CREATION AS DEREALIZATION. NOVELTY AND VIRTUALITY IN THE AESTHETIC THOUGHT OF ORTEGA Y GASSET
This confers higher stability to the radical form and participates in electron derealization; the 2,3 double bond in conjugation with a 4-oxo bond in the C ring are responsible for electron derealization from the B ring.
During the episodes, the patients had cognitive and behavioral disorders, for example, depression, apathy, irritability, and derealization; five patients had eating disturbances.
(332) On "derealization" as an idiom and upshot of unjust sociolegal formations, see Judith Butler, Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence 34 (2006).
when I should be writing mock case notes or reading chapters on empathy tests, right and wrong trees, trauma, processing, latent response, gaslighting, derealization, pushing the goalpost, etc ...
Dissociation is clinically seen in different forms, such as dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity, derealization, and depersonalization (1).
Suffering from depersonalization, derealization, impoverishment of affects, and delusions of persecution and nihilation, Julie tellingly reported that 'the trouble was that she was not a real person; she was trying to become a person...
By the way, I am of the opinion that it would be interesting to consider whether this state of genuine doubt might even explain some cases of depersonalization and derealization which arise when someone is diagnosed with a fulminant and incurable disease.