depth psychology


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psychology

 [si-kol´o-je]
the science dealing with the mind and mental processes, especially in relation to human and animal behavior. adj., adj psycholog´ic, psycholog´ical.
analytic psychology (analytical psychology) the system of psychology founded by Carl Gustav Jung, based on the concepts of the collective unconscious and the complex.
clinical psychology the use of psychologic knowledge and techniques in the treatment of persons with emotional difficulties.
community psychology the application of psychological principles to the study and support of the mental health of individuals in their social sphere.
criminal psychology the study of the mentality, the motivation, and the social behavior of criminals.
depth psychology the study of unconscious mental processes.
developmental psychology the study of changes in behavior that occur with age.
dynamic psychology psychology stressing the causes and motivations for behavior.
environmental psychology study of the effects of the physical and social environment on behavior.
experimental psychology the study of the mind and mental operations by the use of experimental methods.
forensic psychology psychology dealing with the legal aspects of behavior and mental disorders.
gestalt psychology gestaltism; the theory that the objects of mind, as immediately presented to direct experience, come as complete unanalyzable wholes or forms that cannot be split into parts.
individual psychology the psychiatric theory of Alfred adler, stressing compensation and overcompensation for feelings of inferiority and the interpersonal nature of a person's problems.
physiologic psychology (physiological psychology) the branch of psychology that studies the relationship between physiologic and psychologic processes.
social psychology psychology that focuses on social interaction, on the ways in which actions of others influence the behavior of an individual.

depth psy·chol·o·gy

the psychology of the unconscious, especially in contrast with older (19th-century) academic psychology dealing only with conscious mentation; sometimes used synonymously with psychoanalysis.

depth psychology

n.
1. Psychology of the unconscious mind.
2. Psychoanalysis.

depth psychology

any approach to psychology that emphasizes the study of personality and behavior in relation to unconscious motivation. See also psychoanalysis.

depth psychology

1. Any school of psychology that emphasizes unconscious motivation, as distinct from the psychology of conscious behaviour.
References in periodicals archive ?
What depth psychology discovered is that in their Zen-like mystery and the tangled copse of their metaphors and symbols, Gnostic writing constituted a treasury of "radical inwardness and imagination" and sounded the beginnings of depth psychology (240).
It's very satisfying to apply my passion for depth psychology, as well as my love of numbers, to move consumers from brand awareness to brand action" says Fiona Lam, Director of Media Intelligence, ID Media.
So too, advances in depth psychology and growing Western exposure to Eastern meditative practices support Jung's belief in "the efficacy of individual revelation and individual knowledge" (134).
The new masters degree program is designed for personal learners interested in expanding their knowledge and for educators wanting to bring the power of mythology and depth psychology into their teaching.
Specifically, he demonstrates how a more adequate anthropology of the Christian vocation can emerge when serious attention is given to what depth psychology says about the unconscious, or perhaps better, subconscious factors that influence choices and actions.
In 2005, at age 76, she returned to the Pacific Graduate Institute to earn a PhD in Depth Psychology and was granted her degree six weeks after her 80th birthday.
also appeals to depth psychology when accounting for Paul's vision on the Damascus Road.
edu/" Pacifica Graduate Institute, one of the country's leading centers for depth psychology, where she continues to serve as a professor and workshop leader.