deprivation


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Related to deprivation: sensory deprivation, Sleep deprivation

deprivation

 [dep-rĭ-va´shun]
loss or absence of parts, organs, powers, or things that are needed.
emotional deprivation deprivation of adequate and appropriate interpersonal or environmental experience, usually in the early developmental years.
maternal deprivation the result of premature loss or absence of the mother or of lack of proper mothering; see also maternal deprivation syndrome.
sensory deprivation a condition in which an individual receives less than normal sensory input. It can be caused by physiological, motor, or environmental disruptions. Effects include boredom, irritability, difficulty in concentrating, confusion, and inaccurate perception of sensory stimuli. Auditory and visual hallucinations and disorientation in time and place indicate perceptual distortions due to sensory deprivation. Symptoms can be produced by solitary confinement, loss of sight or hearing, paralysis, and even by ordinary hospital bed rest.
sleep deprivation a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as prolonged periods of time without sleep (sustained, natural, periodic suspension of relative consciousness).
thought deprivation blocking (def. 2).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dep·ri·va·tion

(dep'ri-vā'shŭn),
Absence, loss, or withholding of something needed.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deprivation

The complete or nearly complete lack of direct access to adequate amenities, housing, employment opportunities etc. Levels of deprivation can be assessed with the standard Townsend measurement, which is based on car ownership, property ownership, unemployment and overcrowding.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dep·ri·va·tion

(dep'ri-vā'shŭn)
Absence, loss, or withholding of something needed.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

deprivation

Failure to obtain or to be provided with a sufficiency of the material, intellectual or spiritual requirements for normal development and happiness.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Deprivation

A condition of having too little of something.
Mentioned in: Shock
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Patient discussion about deprivation

Q. what are the affects of sleep deprivation, and can I counteract them? I’m a college student and I’ve been sleeping for 5-6 hours a night for the past month…what symptoms should I expect? And how can I counteract them?

A. I studied this just 2 days ago:

Studies on sleep deprivation are actually beginning to show that people do not require as much sleep as traditionally taught. While sleep deficits effect first auditory acuity, and can even cause people to go into what are called microsleeps, researchers are finding that when people are being deprived of sleep they actually sleep more efficiently (spending more time in stages 3 and 4 of sleep) The problem is that people do not train themselves properly to shortened sleep periods, thus stuggle to adapt when they cannot receive the customary eight hours. Ideally, with adequate control and preperation, people can sleep for 4 hours a night and be fully cognatively functional.

(DaVinci purportedly survived on 15min cat naps taken every four hours his entire adult life, and he was certainly on his toes)

Just thought you'de find that interesting

See Pinel's chapter on Sleep in his text "Biopsychology" for more. (Pinel, 2009)

Adieu

More discussions about deprivation
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References in periodicals archive ?
Long-term sleep deprivation increases the risk of brain cell damage and can directly affect your mood.
According to the researchers, this damage may help explain the increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular, metabolic diseases as well as neurodegenerative disorders that are usually associated with sleep deprivation.
This requires, in the case of Palestine, a clear, political distinction between Palestinians and the PA, which cannot be implemented unless there is a collective disengagement from the prevailing humanitarian narratives that thrive upon cycles of deprivation.
There was an association between greater area-level deprivation and significantly lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores.
"Deprivation area is calculated using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) which is an area-based measurement of multiple deprivation.
The findings also showed a trend of poverty spreading from urban areas to their fringes and a rise in the deprivation divide between urban and rural areas.
Regarding the documents about the effects of sleep loss on immune and performance function, role of long term sleep deprivation (i.e., 13 years) on these variables is unclear.
In most of the countries for which 2017 data are available, the severe material deprivation rate decreased compared with 2016.
The Afghan leader said the central provinces were facing a situation similar to imprisonment but he insisted that the situation is gradually improving and deprivation is on the verge of collapse.
According to the definitions of "material and social deprivation", Eurostat uses, this means that these citizens could not afford at least five items out of this list:
The amendments propose either triple fine with deprivation of driving rights or imprisonment up to 3 years with deprivation of driving rights for 3 years for violation of tariffs rules and causing bodily harm to a person during driving the vehicle.