depressor

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Related to depressor muscle: extensor muscle, flexor muscle, supinator muscle

depressor

 [de-pres´or]
1. anything that depresses, such as a muscle, agent, or instrument. See also depressant.
2. depressor nerve.
tongue depressor an instrument for pressing down the tongue, allowing better visualization of the oropharynx.

de·pres·sor

(dĕ-pres'ŏr),
1. A muscle that flattens or lowers a part.
2. Anything that depresses or retards functional activity.
3. An instrument or device used to push certain structures out of the way during an operation or examination.
4. An agent that decreases blood pressure. Synonym(s): hypotensor, vasodepressor (2)
[L. de-primo, pp. -pressus, to press down]

depressor

/de·pres·sor/ (de-pres´er)
1. that which causes depression, as a muscle, agent, or instrument.

depressor

(dĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
1. Something that depresses or is used to depress.
2. An instrument used to depress a part: a tongue depressor.
3. Any of various muscles that serve to draw down a part of the body.

depressor

[dipres′ər]
Etymology: L, deprimere, to press down
any agent that reduces activity when applied to nerves and muscles. See also depressant.

de·pres·sor

(dĕ-pres'ŏr)
1. A muscle that flattens or lowers a part.
2. Anything that depresses or retards functional activity.
3. An instrument or device used to push certain structures out of the way during an operation or examination.
4. An agent that decreases blood pressure.
[L. de-primo, pp. -pressus, to press down]

depressor

muscle whose action flattens or lowers a body part

de·pres·sor

(dĕ-pres'ŏr)
1. Instrument or device used to push structures out of the way during an operation or anatomic examination.
2. A muscle that flattens or lowers a part.
[L. de-primo, pp. -pressus, to press down]

depressor

anything that depresses, as a muscle, agent or instrument, or an afferent nerve, whose stimulation causes a fall in blood pressure.

tongue depressor
an instrument for pressing down the tongue, usually for purposes of visualizing the soft palate and posterior pharynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
The data suggest: 1) that surface electrode EMG biofeedback is a reliable indicator of the activity of the laryngeal depressor muscles ST/SH; 2) that EMG biofeedback is useful in teaching both male and female singers to activate the laryngeal depressor muscles and to maintain a lower laryngeal posture while singing; and 3) that the achievement of said laryngeal posture improves the perceived quality of sung tone, intensifies the "singer's formant cluster," increases the overall amplitude of the tone, and encourages vibrato oscillations.
According to videoendoscopy, other parts of the vocal mechanism often show oscillations in sync with the vibrato, including: (1) laryngeal depressor muscles, such as the sternothyroid and sternohyoid muscles; (2) the lateral pharyngeal wall; (3) the velum or soft palate; (4) the base of the tongue; (5) and the epiglottis.
The reduction of size is already a fact in the clear timbre, where no infrahyoideous muscles came into action to counteract the action of the arytenoideous muscles; but it is especially striking, if we produce the sounds in the somber timbre [voix sombree]; the lips of the glottis must then, by their own contractive force, resist not only the column of air, but also the opposed and considerable force of the depressor muscles, which tend to open the thyroid cartilage and to separate these same lips.