deponent


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deponent

(dē-pō′nĕnt)
One who testifies under oath about the facts at issue in litigation. The testimony is transcribed by a court reporter and becomes part of the legal record.
References in periodicals archive ?
Relying on what he termed the "clear and direct" language of Superior Court Civil Rules 26(b)(1) and 30(c), he admonished that "[t]he only instance, we repeat, the only instance in which an attorney is justified in instructing a deponent not to answer is when the question calls for information that is privileged."
Kemmer (1993) stresses it in her work that middle verbs can be deponents, i.e.
(25) The specific phrase, "objection, leading," has been approved previously, even by a court that limits all other form objections to, "objection, form." (26) That court sustained the objection that questioning lawyer's questions were leading after the deponent's lawyer stated during the deposition that he had "been very lenient about leading [questions], but [I] would ask that you let the doctor testify as opposed to you," calling it an objection "served on a platter of civility." (27) The objection to leading questions is therefore appropriate.
The persons being deposed are called "deponents." When you receive a deposition notice, review the deposition topics and reach out internally to determine who would be best situated to speak to those topics.
{Use this paragraph when the deponent has been authorized to provide expert testimony.
Have your 30(b)(6) deponent review prior production records on the model or product in question.
require the party or deponent whose conduct necessitated the motion, the party or attorney advising that conduct, or both to pay the movant's reasonable expenses incurred in making the motion, including attorney's fees," (34) unless (1) the motion was filed before a good faith attempt to obtain the deposition, (2) the refusal was "substantially justified," or (3) "other circumstances make an award of expenses unjust." (35) "If the motion [to compel] is denied, the court may issue any protective order authorized under Rule 26(c) and must ...
The end of the game managed to the idea that balance is reached only when the players (both deponent and borrower) will withdraw money from the bank together.
Establish rapport with your "witness." At the outset of a deposition, litigators try to establish rapport with the deponent to maximize their chances of getting the witness to volunteer information.
Obviously, this presents a potential for abuse which is not extant where the party noticing the deposition specifies the deponent. When a corporation or association designates a person to testify on its behalf, the corporation appears vicariously through that agent.
And finally, Anderson's attorney pleaded with the court, "Such discovery requests offend traditional sense of American jurisprudence and are fundamentally unfair to the deponent and serve no legitimate purpose under [the law]."