depersonalize

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depersonalize

(dē-pûr′sə-nə-līz′)
tr.v. depersonal·ized, depersonal·izing, depersonal·izes
1. To deprive of individual character or a sense of personal identity: a large corporation that depersonalizes its employees.
2. To render impersonal: depersonalize an interview.

de·per′son·al·i·za′tion (-sə-nə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.

depersonalize

(dē-pĕr′sŏn-ăl-īz″)
To make impersonal; to deprive of personality or individuality.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Proposition 2: Workgroup and organizational identifications satisfy individuals personalized and depersonalized belongingness motives, respectively.
Yeats perceived this Japanese dance form as utterly depersonalized. "Impersonation is replaced by abstract dance," Puchner explains of Yeats's Plays for Dancers, as a "solution to the problem of acting." (28) While Yeats misunderstood many of the finer nuances of the noh technique, the manner in which he came to perceive it as representative of self-elision and disciplined submission is understandable.
The research in this special issue, both in content and in methodology, seeks to understand education "from the inside" and provides a potentially powerful antidote to the current depersonalized and decontextualized political, popular, and educational discourses.
Finding what is true to nature requires a kind of genius, scarcely depersonalized.
"THE EMOTIONALLY Detached Customer" (Viewpoint, April 2007) should be hitting a nerve for a lot of businesses that have depersonalized business interactions for the sake of efficiency.
* Their relationships become increasingly depersonalized.
This can leave many patients feeling depersonalized.
A reviewer for Frontpagemag.com said, "Israelis are depersonalized and utterly demonized.
While legitimate power is depersonalized, expert power comes out of respect for the person's recognized skills and abilities.
In 1984, the political novel's most famous modern exemplar, Orwell reckoned with the most decisive forces loose in the modern world: not merely the rise of totalitarian political regimes, but also the triumph of a depersonalized mass culture, the humorless bureaucratized workplace, and the abolition of historical memory.
"It is in the schools and from the mass media," wrote Goodman, "that the mass of our citizens in all classes learn that life is inevitably routine, depersonalized, venally graded."
The Aloha Foundation's values--similar to those of the country's finest American Camping Association camps--of self-knowledge, friendship building, cooperation, service to others, and respect for our natural environment are all the more important for young people to carry with them into a depersonalized, technological, often violent, and ever-changing world.