depersonalize

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depersonalize

(dē-pûr′sə-nə-līz′)
tr.v. depersonal·ized, depersonal·izing, depersonal·izes
1. To deprive of individual character or a sense of personal identity: a large corporation that depersonalizes its employees.
2. To render impersonal: depersonalize an interview.

de·per′son·al·i·za′tion (-sə-nə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.

depersonalize

(dē-pĕr′sŏn-ăl-īz″)
To make impersonal; to deprive of personality or individuality.
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References in periodicals archive ?
44) Against Yeats's ideal of a depersonalized presentation of his poetry, Ito privileged individualized self-expression in performance.
Finding what is true to nature requires a kind of genius, scarcely depersonalized.
Many people who have appointments with their ophthalmologists, dermatologists, gastroenterologists, pulmonologists, and endocrinologists can feel depersonalized, as if they are merely a collection of parts.
The Aloha Foundation's values--similar to those of the country's finest American Camping Association camps--of self-knowledge, friendship building, cooperation, service to others, and respect for our natural environment are all the more important for young people to carry with them into a depersonalized, technological, often violent, and ever-changing world.
As such, they are safe to recount because they are distant in time, unique in occurrence, and depersonalized.
At the end of this shift, by the eighteenth century, God will become in the minds of many curiously mute, and by that fact depersonalized, a mere mechanic, a celestial architect, a mason, whose laws concern not the human consciousness but the ranging of objects in space" (234).
Patients feel depersonalized, hospitals are financially strapped, doctors fear malpractice suits at every turn, and insurance companies seem to run everything.
While we might service customers more rapidly now, technology has depersonalized our industry to the point that the NAIIA is not well enough known to potential OR existing customers.
These critics find very little difference between erotic literature and porn's glorification of lust and seduction, indiscriminate coupling and depersonalized sex.
Mallarme's poems are microcosmic by comparison with Proust's macrocosmic novel, private worlds protected by ambiguity and compression unlike Proust's novelistic expansiveness and explicitness; paradoxically his poems seek, in their "memories of horizons," (17) a personal immortality through the construction of a poetically depersonalized work of art.
As Campbell puts it, "[d] ream is the personalized myth, myth the depersonalized dream" (19), but while their dreams might be moving toward myth, their writing on the war was consciously realistic and ironic.
Pornography represses personality and exalts the depersonalized, despiritualized body.