depersonalization


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Related to depersonalization: depersonalization disorder

depersonalization

 [de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun]
alteration in the perception of the self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is lost, manifested in a sense of unreality or self-estrangement, in changes of body image, or in a feeling that one does not control one's own actions and speech; seen in disorders such as depersonalization disorder (see also dissociative disorders), depression, hypochondriasis, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia, and schizotypal personality disorder. Some authorities do not draw a distinction between this concept and derealization, and use the term depersonalization to include both.
depersonalization disorder a dissociative disorder in which there are feelings of unreality and strangeness in one's perception of self or of one's body image. Individuals with this disorder may feel as though they are in a dream or are not totally in control of their actions. Episodes of depersonalization are usually accompanied by dizziness, anxiety, fears of going insane, and derealization.

Depersonalization as an isolated event occurs in many people without significantly affecting their functioning; it is considered a disorder only when it impairs the patient's daily activities, when it is not associated with some other mental disorder, and when the patient's perception of reality remains intact.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
A state in which one loses the feeling of one's own identity in relation to others in one's family or peer group, or loses the feeling of one's own reality.

depersonalization

/de·per·son·al·iza·tion/ (de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun) alteration in the perception of self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is temporarily lost or changed; it may be a manifestation of a neurosis or another mental disorder or can occur in mild form in normal persons.

depersonalization

[dēpur′sənəlīzā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + persona, mask
a feeling of strangeness or unreality concerning oneself or the environment, often resulting from anxiety, stress, or fatigue. Also called self- alienation. See also alienation, depersonalization disorder.

depersonalization

Psychiatry A sense of unreality or strangeness vis-á-vis the environment and/or self; a personality disorder in which the Pt thinks that either he or those in his environment have been changed into other people or life-forms; depersonalization classically occurs in schizophrenia, but may also occur in hysteria, depression, drug-induced states, temporal lobe epilepsy, and fatigue. See Derealization, Neurosis. Cf Dehumanization.
Depersonalization disorder–
A  Persistent or recurrent sensation of detachment from one's own body, as if in a dream
B  During the depersonalization experience, the subject's reality testing remains intact
C  The depersonalization results in significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, other function
D  The experience does not occur exclusively during the course of another mental disorder
DSM-IV™, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC, 1994  

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
A state in which someone loses the feeling of his own identity in relation to others in his family or peer group, or loses the feeling of his own reality.
Synonym(s): depersonalisation.

depersonalization

Loss of the sense of one's own reality. A dream-like feeling of being detached from one's own body or a feeling that one's body is unreal or strange. This may be a normal phenomenon.

Depersonalization

A dissociative symptom in which the patient feels that his or her body is unreal, is changing, or is dissolving.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results indicated that depersonalization influenced IEP outcomes through an indirect effect on teaching quality and student engagement (indirect effect = -.
The Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire, emotional burnout, depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores in residents of pediatrics according to demographic and occupational properties MJSQ EB Median Median (IQR) (IQR) Sex Female 39(26-46) 34(20-30) Male 34(24-40) 32(20-32) p 0.
In addition, it has been reported that women suffer more from emotional exhaustion than men; that personal perceptions, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization levels of nurses who work shifts are generally higher; and that depersonalization reduces with increased employment duration (22).
Although not statistically significant, the primary care physicians had a higher stress level, higher degrees of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and a lower degree of personal accomplishment than the hospital doctors.
A t-test showed statistically significant relationships between depersonalization and gender, between urban/rural designation and both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, between being or not local and both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and between health status and depersonalization (the p-values were 0.
The mean pre-intervention Depersonalization (DP) score was 5.
Is there a relationship between CITs' levels of wellness, as measured by the subscales of the 5F-Wel (Myers & Sweeney, 2005), and emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment, as measured by the MBI-HSS (Maslach & Jackson, 1996)?
The depersonalization dimension of burnout encompasses how individuals respond to others (the recipients of the organization).
H1a: Burnout development among software professionals follows a sequence wherein Depersonalization leads to reduced Personal Accomplishment and reduced Personal Accomplishment leads to Emotional Exhaustion.
High point of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization with low points of personal accomplishment shows high level of occupational burnout For analyzing data, record or converting (5) method is used in personal accomplishment.
Each one-point increase in depersonalization was associated with an 11% increase in reporting an error (Ann.