depersonalize

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depersonalize

(dē-pûr′sə-nə-līz′)
tr.v. depersonal·ized, depersonal·izing, depersonal·izes
1. To deprive of individual character or a sense of personal identity: a large corporation that depersonalizes its employees.
2. To render impersonal: depersonalize an interview.

de·per′son·al·i·za′tion (-sə-nə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

depersonalize

(dē-pĕr′sŏn-ăl-īz″)
To make impersonal; to deprive of personality or individuality.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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(42) Taking this analysis further, fundamental to the maintenance and reproduction of disciplinary power is offering subjects the ontological security necessary as subjects to act intentionally within a set of depersonalised regulatory technologies.
Highlighted, in turn, is how individuals turn to and invest in the government and sovereignty more generally, to help them navigate and individuate themselves within a seemingly depersonalised disciplinary system.
The former, again, connotes the inscription of individuals within broader inscriptive discourses and practices while the latter is the affective identity supplementing these depersonalised regimes of power.
Individuals continue to affectively invest in this externalised authority for anchoring their identity and thus achieving a precarious ontological security within otherwise depersonalised and diverse configurations of modern disciplinary power.
Individuals, therefore, affectively invest in the 'heroism' of successful CEOs and entrepreneurs, as a way to maintain the illusion of selfhood in an otherwise depersonalised and regulative capitalist world.
This may make her feel depersonalised, sad and depressed.
He said: "In our depersonalised world, the search for reality and authenticity is an obsession for young people.
Fetishes are more common in men, and if arousal becomes more to do with the action - spanking, for instance - than with the partner, even the strongest- willed woman will feel depersonalised.