depersonalization disorder

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depersonalization

 [de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun]
alteration in the perception of the self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is lost, manifested in a sense of unreality or self-estrangement, in changes of body image, or in a feeling that one does not control one's own actions and speech; seen in disorders such as depersonalization disorder (see also dissociative disorders), depression, hypochondriasis, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia, and schizotypal personality disorder. Some authorities do not draw a distinction between this concept and derealization, and use the term depersonalization to include both.
depersonalization disorder a dissociative disorder in which there are feelings of unreality and strangeness in one's perception of self or of one's body image. Individuals with this disorder may feel as though they are in a dream or are not totally in control of their actions. Episodes of depersonalization are usually accompanied by dizziness, anxiety, fears of going insane, and derealization.

Depersonalization as an isolated event occurs in many people without significantly affecting their functioning; it is considered a disorder only when it impairs the patient's daily activities, when it is not associated with some other mental disorder, and when the patient's perception of reality remains intact.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion dis·or·der

1. a disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent experiences of detachment from one's mental processes or body, as if one is an automaton, an outside observer, or in a dream; reality testing remains intact and there is clinically significant distress impairment.
2. a DSM diagnosis is established when the specified criteria are met.

depersonalization disorder

n.
A psychiatric disorder in which the normal sense of personal identity and reality is lost.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion dis·or·der

(dē-pĕrsŏn-ăl-ī-zāshŭn dis-ōrdĕr)
Disorder characterized by persistent or recurrent experiences of detachment from one's mental processes or body, as if one is an automaton, an outside observer, or in a dream.
References in periodicals archive ?
David, "Depersonalisation disorder: a cognitive-behavioural conceptualisation," Behaviour Research and Therapy, vol.
In Numb, Perry's character suffers from acute depersonalisation disorder, a condition so alienating and sanguine that it makes the chronically depressed look perky.
Through his kaleidoscopic images, Caouette reveals his close bond with his mentally ill mother Renee, and his transformation from an insecure 13-year-old discovering his sexual identity on the local gay club scene, to a 20-something coping with depersonalisation disorder living with his boyfriend David in New York.
It's ostensibly a memoir of his mother, Renee, a one time Texan child model who, following a fall when she was 12, spent the next two years having electro shock treatment for what her parents believed was a psychosomatic condition and pretty much the rest of her life in and out of mental hospitals It's also a self-addressed survivor's love letter to Caouette who went through drugs and attempted suicide and, diagnosed with depersonalisation disorder, constantly refers to himself in the third person.