depersonalization

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Related to depersonalisation: depersonalisation disorder, Derealisation

depersonalization

 [de-per″sun-al-ĭ-za´shun]
alteration in the perception of the self so that the usual sense of one's own reality is lost, manifested in a sense of unreality or self-estrangement, in changes of body image, or in a feeling that one does not control one's own actions and speech; seen in disorders such as depersonalization disorder (see also dissociative disorders), depression, hypochondriasis, temporal lobe epilepsy, schizophrenia, and schizotypal personality disorder. Some authorities do not draw a distinction between this concept and derealization, and use the term depersonalization to include both.
depersonalization disorder a dissociative disorder in which there are feelings of unreality and strangeness in one's perception of self or of one's body image. Individuals with this disorder may feel as though they are in a dream or are not totally in control of their actions. Episodes of depersonalization are usually accompanied by dizziness, anxiety, fears of going insane, and derealization.

Depersonalization as an isolated event occurs in many people without significantly affecting their functioning; it is considered a disorder only when it impairs the patient's daily activities, when it is not associated with some other mental disorder, and when the patient's perception of reality remains intact.

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-i-zā'shŭn),
A state in which one loses the feeling of one's own identity in relation to others in one's family or peer group, or loses the feeling of one's own reality.

depersonalization

Psychiatry A sense of unreality or strangeness vis-á-vis the environment and/or self; a personality disorder in which the Pt thinks that either he or those in his environment have been changed into other people or life-forms; depersonalization classically occurs in schizophrenia, but may also occur in hysteria, depression, drug-induced states, temporal lobe epilepsy, and fatigue. See Derealization, Neurosis. Cf Dehumanization.
Depersonalization disorder–
A  Persistent or recurrent sensation of detachment from one's own body, as if in a dream
B  During the depersonalization experience, the subject's reality testing remains intact
C  The depersonalization results in significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, other function
D  The experience does not occur exclusively during the course of another mental disorder
DSM-IV™, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC, 1994  

de·per·son·al·i·za·tion

(dē-pĕr'sŏn-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
A state in which someone loses the feeling of his own identity in relation to others in his family or peer group, or loses the feeling of his own reality.
Synonym(s): depersonalisation.

depersonalization

Loss of the sense of one's own reality. A dream-like feeling of being detached from one's own body or a feeling that one's body is unreal or strange. This may be a normal phenomenon.

Depersonalization

A dissociative symptom in which the patient feels that his or her body is unreal, is changing, or is dissolving.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other studies have described lower depersonalisation (eg.
Factor 2 showed consistent loadings for depersonalisation items on both the US and NZ structures.
A study by Perez18 on university students from Chile confirmed that the scale measures the three factors proposed by Maslach and Jackson: depersonalisation and emotional burnout, with possible scores between 0 and 42, and the factor of high personal accomplishment, with scores between 0 and 48.
Literature review showed different dimensions of burnout i.e., physical burnout, emotional burnout, including psychological symptoms of burnout, social isolation, lack of self-proficiency, satisfaction with occupation, depersonalisation, problems in relationship with friends and family, aggression, drug abuse, irritation blooms, lack of interest to learn new skills to grow professionally and inability to manage time.10 Divorce, broken relationships, sleep disturbances, especially insomnia, mood swings, especially depressive episodes, and other physical ailments such as gastrointestinal problems, numbness, high blood pressure, headache, anxiety, substance abuse and suicide have been mentioned as strong indicators of burnout.11
Marital status job's requirements work environment shifts social status of the job length of service and personal characteristics are important for burnout and job satisfaction.1617 Job satisfaction of married physicians was reported to be higher.22 In a study with teaching staff emotional burnout was found to be more frequent among singles while depersonalisation was more frequent among married lecturers.
"Most doctors and psychiatrists are trained to believe that depersonalisation disorder is extremely rare, and when present, is usually a secondary symptom of another condition such as anxiety or depression," Hunter says.
Nine items pertain to emotional exhaustion, five assess depersonalisation and the eight items assess personal accomplishment.
Reliability of Depersonalisation The calculated value of r=0.65 Hence, [r.sub.SB]=0.79
Simeon, "Depersonalisation disorder: a contemporary overview," CNS Drugs, vol.
The authors defined this popular psychological phenomenon as "a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and reduced personal accomplishment that can occur among individuals who do 'people work' of some kind" (Maslach and Jackson 1986).
It identified increasing depersonalisation; too many ritual tasks.