deontology


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
It addresses the problems with deontology by effectively abandoning deontology.
For those who have left the formal education system, ie those who will never integrate into a formal education program, education in the field of ethics and deontology, updating and nuance of certain challenges in this field will be done through trainings organized by the various professional bodies in the field.
So, although Ability appears to be agent-neutral, it is not a deontic constraint and thus fails to satisfy a necessary condition of deontology.
Thus, the attempt to validate ubuntu ethics through comparing them with Kantian deontology as is done by Metz (2007) and Taylor (2014) also becomes false.
Deontology, on the other hand, is a moral principle that determines what is right from wrong, based on adherence to hospital rules.
Another possible solution outside of the scope of conflict of laws is what some courts and some academic commentators have termed the double deontology rule--that, where applicable, the harsher rule should be followed.
Public health (0/143) + avoidance style (0139) + deontology (-0/18) + agreeability (-0/268) + eager to new experiences (0192) + neurosis (0172) + 30/388 = internet addiction
The word deontology derives from the Greek words "deon," "deontoS' (meaning what is appropriate, what has to be done) and "logos'" (knowledge, study).
If we look upon CDs in this more comprehensive manner, deep ethical oppositions of the deontology vs.
Framed as an analogy to a position in moral philosophy known as "threshold deontology," two-tiered interpretive theory treats rules that restrict executive power as normally inviolable, not subject to a case-by-case balancing analysis.
The new graduate programs in nursing are considering the integration of the subjects of deontology and professional ethics into the nursing curriculum.