deontology


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that for two days, various topics related to ethics and deontology, relations between Parliament and the Executive, protocol rules, parliamentary terminologies, parliamentary groups and political parties will be addressed.
So, although Ability appears to be agent-neutral, it is not a deontic constraint and thus fails to satisfy a necessary condition of deontology.
It is also common because it is a characteristic feature of all Bantu-speaking people and it does not need to be established and authenticated by one person, as is the case with Aristotelian eudaimonism, Kantian deontology, Platonic Justice and Metzian basic norm.
Moreover, double deontology does not address the issue of how a lawyer should proceed in a case where two rules or obligations are in direct conflict.
Public health (0/143) + avoidance style (0139) + deontology (-0/18) + agreeability (-0/268) + eager to new experiences (0192) + neurosis (0172) + 30/388 = internet addiction
Deontology as a science aims to improve the efficiency of the public service and to meet the needs of the citizen (Preda, 2004: 131).
Likewise deontology endorses an action-guiding orientation, because deontology upholds that some actions are essentially right or wrong, and therefore they must be performed or avoided (Kant 1911; Ross 2002).
Nevertheless, by analogy to the moral wrongs that threshold deontology sometimes regards as lesser evils, some presidential actions that are justified only pursuant to the second-tier principles governing exigent cases should be regarded as lesser legal evils that are regrettably in breach of ordinary legal and constitutional ideals that emergency does not eradicate.
H2: The teachers identify reasons related to philosophical values (justice, deontology, utilitarianism, relativism and egoism) as reasons for ethical their ethical decision-making.
Sue Cornforth's paper (this issue) begins by locating supervision at the interstices of the discourses of fidelity, professional care and cultural respect, while considering larger questions regarding deontology and principlism in ethics seen through a feminist poststructural lens.
He argues that the traditional ethical frameworks of deontology and utilitarianism cannot provide an answer to the question central to sustainability ethics, "How ought one to live in regard to the sustainability relations?
1] In contrast, deontology asserts that deeds have inherent moral worth.