deontology

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de·on·tol·o·gy

(dē'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The study of professional ethics and duties.
[G. deon (deont-), that which is binding, pr. part. ntr. of dei, (impers.) it behooves, fr. deō, to bind, + logos, study]

deontology

(de?on-tol'o-je) [Gr. deonta, needful, + logos, word, reason]
System of ethical decision making that is based on moral rules and unchanging principles.
See: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
I have not, of course, proved that Socrates is a deontologist.
Not only do they present people as multidimensional, rather than solely as egoists, or utilitarians, or deontologists, thus making literature more realistic, but they also explore how characters change as the stories unfold.
And most deontologists would insist that a payment of money, without more, does not rectify the harm caused by breaching the promisee's entitlement to performance.
I have downplayed other interesting issues that Hurd addresses in the course of analyzing the dilemma--for example, whether duties to uphold the systemic values are weightier for officials than for citizens, and whether deontologists are committed to the correspondence thesis.
Second, against those who might be labeled orthodox deontologists (i.
26) Peffer identifies Marx's moral theory as "mixed deontologist," as one
How, asks the deontologist, can we use a standard to determine whether an act is ethical that is impossible to apply at the time the act is performed?
So, what should the deontologist say about a situation where the agent is uncertain about which action constitutes killing?
A deontological theory emphasizes duties, but a deontologist can also be concerned about consequences.
If you are a deontologist, you are more likely to regard it as a Frankenstein's monster.
Our analysis thus applies both to deontologist and consequentialist approaches that advocate downward adjustment of the punishment to account for the risk of wrongful conviction.
Hence, I hope that it becomes clear that many different kinds of liberals--including deontologist as well as consequentialist liberals--should favour extensive free speech since the argument will rest on premises that all liberals share.