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denial

 [dĕ-ni´al]
in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is denied and kept out of conscious awareness. By keeping the stressors out of consciousness, they are prevented from causing anxiety.
ineffective denial a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as denial that is detrimental to health when a person makes a conscious or unconscious attempt to disavow the meaning or even the knowledge of an event in order to reduce anxiety or fear.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl),
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
Synonym(s): negation
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]

denial

/de·ni·al/ (dĭ-ni´il) in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is kept out of conscious awareness.

denial

(dĭ-nī′əl)
n.
1. A refusal to comply with or satisfy a request.
2. Abstinence; self-denial.

denial

[dinī′əl]
Etymology: L, denegare, to negate
1 refusal or restriction of something requested, claimed, or needed, often causing physical or emotional deficiency.
2 an unconscious defense mechanism in which emotional conflict and anxiety are avoided by refusal to acknowledge those thoughts, feelings, desires, impulses, or facts that are consciously intolerable.

denial

Psychiatry A primitive–ego defense–mechanism by which a person unconsciously negates the existence of a disease or other stress-producing reality in his environment, by disavowing thoughts, feelings, wishes, needs, or external reality factors that are consciously intolerable. See In denial.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts or troublesome impulses.
Synonym(s): negation.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denego, to say no]

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]
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Integrating Society6's direct-to-consumer ecommerce model and insight into trending styles with Deny Designs' product development capabilities positions Leaf Group to provide data to inform retail distribution partners of customer purchase patterns and design trends.
Defendants deny the allegations of paragraph 14 of the Amended Complaint on the basis that they lack knowledge or information sufficient to form a belief as to the truth of the allegations contained therein.
5) Summary Statement of the Honorable Mary Sheila Gall on Vote to Deny Petition for Rule Requiring Product Registration Cards, March 7, 2003.
This process would deny taxpayers access to the Tax Court and impose additional burdens and demands on both taxpayers and the government.
According to the study, five out of 178 Latin-rite Catholic dioceses in America have indicated they would deny communion to pro-choice politicians.
This will let the wing know that he can continue to deny.
6) The court distinguished this so-called right to deny from a right to lie or affirmatively mislead an agency engaged in an investigation:
It seems arbitrary to deny ourselves this relatively innocuous indulgence on such flimsy grounds, especially when the cost of prohibition is so high in person-hours of enforcement and in sentence-years served.
He said either Williams' amateur status (particularly the hiring of the agent) or academic status would have been sufficient to deny the request.
Jesse Helms promoted schemes to deny the federal courts the right to hear school prayer cases.
The basic problem is that some scientists claim that truth in these matters can be found only by their science; they deny that there are other ways of knowing, such as by God speaking to us, or philosophers deriving truths from thought passing beyond the "scientific dogma" that everything is material.