dentin

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dentin

 [den´tin]
the chief substance of the teeth, surrounding the tooth pulp and covered by the enamel on the crown and by cementum on the roots. adj., adj den´tinal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

den·tin

(den'tin), Do not confuse this word with dentine.
The ivory forming the mass of the tooth. About 20% is organic matrix, mostly type I collagen, with some elastin and a small amount of mucopolysaccharide; the inorganic fraction (70%) is mainly hydroxyapatite, with some carbonate, magnesium, and fluoride. The dentin is traversed by a large number of fine tunnels known as tubules, running from the pulp cavity outward; within the tubules are processes from the odontoblasts.
[L. dens, tooth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dentin

(dĕn′tĭn) or

dentine

(-tēn′)
n.
The main, calcareous part of a tooth, beneath the enamel and surrounding the pulp chamber and root canals.

den′tin·al (dĕn′tə-nəl, dĕn-tē′-) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

den·tin

(den'tin)
The ivory forming the mass of the tooth. Calcified tissue that is not as hard as enamel but harder than cementum. About 20% is organic matrix, mostly a fibrous protein collagen, with some elastin and a small amount of mucopolysaccharide; the inorganic fraction (70%) is mainly hydroxyapatite, with some carbonate, magnesium, and fluoride. It is traversed by closely packed tubules running from the pulp cavity outward; within the tubules are processes from the odontoblasts.
Synonym(s): dentinum.
[L. dens, tooth]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Dentin

The middle layer of a tooth, which makes up most of the tooth's mass.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

den·tin

(den'tin)
[TA] Ivory forming mass of tooth.
Synonym(s): dentinum [TA] , ebur dentis.
[L. dens, tooth]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most important properties that permanent obturation cements must possess is viscosity (the fluidity) of the material, in order to fill in the space between the gutta-percha and the dentin walls better, and be able to reach and fill in all the irregularities of the canal space and to obturate the holes of the lateral and the accessory canals [6].
Good adaptation and bondage of sealers with the dentin walls was noticed.
At cross sections of samples made in the middle third (Figure 2), a slightly uneven contact surface on the bondage area of the sealer and the dentin walls was found, as well as presence of a small number of cracks and space gaps in root canals filled with Endomethasone and N2 (relatively good adhesion--grade 3).
(4,11-12,22) The high intensity of the diode laser has notable effects on intracanal irradiation, including bacterial reduction (8,10) and melting and resolidification of dentin walls, with partial occlusion of dentinal tubules.
This method is commonly used to assess micro- and nanoleakage of composite fillings, by tracing gaps and spaces between the composite and dentin walls. (17,20,22) As with any other method, dye or tracing tests do not represent or simulate the exact behavior of these sealers in clinical conditions.
Adding a detergent solution to the original Formulation of EDTA has led to increased surface tension for this substance, with the result that greater permeability of the dentin tubules and better cleaning of the dentin walls of the root canals has thereby been provided.
Considering the chelating agents utilized in this study, EDTA-T and EDTA-C, EDTA-T showed cleaner dentin walls than did EDTA-C.
(17) evaluated the efficacy of the F1 instrument of the ProTaper system, and instrument size 25, 0.06 taper of the K3 System, combined with NaOCl or EDTA, in removing calcium hydroxide from root canal dentin walls. They found that, the F1 instrument performed better in the apical and cervical thirds than the K3 instrument, size 25, 0.06 taper, regardless of the final irrigating solution.
The technique employed in the present study did not allow the first apical file to touch all dentin walls of the apical region.