bonding

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bonding

 [bond´ing]
1. joining together securely with an adhesive substance.
2. the development of a close emotional tie to a mate or to a newborn; called also claiming and binding-in. It is thought that optimal bonding of the parents to a newborn requires a period of close contact in the first few hours after birth. The mother initiates bonding when she caresses her infant and exhibits certain behaviors typical of a mother tending her child. The infant's responses to this, such as body and eye movements, are a necessary part of the process. The length of time necessary for bonding depends on the health of the infant and mother, as well as on circumstances surrounding labor and delivery. The presence of the father during the birth increases his bonding to the infant.
dentin bonding establishment of a micromechanical bond between cut dentin and the bonding agent.
enamel bonding tooth bonding.
tooth bonding the technique of fixing orthodontic brackets or other attachments directly to the enamel surface with orthodontic adhesives.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bond·ing

(bon'ding),
Formation of a close and enduring emotional attachment, such as between parent and child, lovers, or husband and wife.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bonding

(bŏn′dĭng)
n.
1.
a. The formation of a close human relationship, as between friends: "He says he has rediscovered the comforts of male bonding in a Washington men's group" (Marilyn Chase).
b. The emotional and physical attachment occurring between a parent or parent figure, especially a mother, and offspring, that usually begins at birth and is the basis for further emotional affiliation.
2.
a. A dental technique in which a material such as plastic or porcelain is attached to the surface of a discolored or damaged tooth.
b. The technique of using adhesives to attach orthodontic brackets or other appliances to the teeth.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cosmetic dentistry
(1) The application of a plastic pearl-colored composite paste—after etching the surface with a mild acid—on the external face of the teeth most involved in smile work
(2) The attachment of material to a tooth to repair and/or change the tooth’s color or shape
Dentistry The attaching of braces to teeth with glue
Neonatology The formation of emotional ties between an infant and mother or other caregiver that occurs in the early post-partum period
Psychiatry The attachment and unity of 2 people whose identities are significantly affected by mutual interactions
Public health See Antibiotic bonding
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bonding

Neonatology The formation of emotional ties between an infant and mother or other caregiver that occurs in the early post-partum. See Companionship, Infant massage. Cf Anaclitic depression, Inner bonding, Male bonding, Social isolation Psychiatry The attachment and unity of 2 people whose identities are significantly affected by mutual interactions Public health See Antibiotic bonding.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bond·ing

(bond'ing)
Formation of a close and enduring emotional attachment, such as between parent and child, lovers, or husband and wife.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bonding

The formation of a strong relationship, particularly that between a mother and her new-born child. Bonding is believed to be important for the future psychological well-being of the infant.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Bonding

Rebuilding, reshaping, and covering tooth defects using tooth-colored materials.
Mentioned in: Cosmetic Dentistry
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bond·ing

(bond'ing)
1. Process by which orthodontic brackets are affixed to tooth surfaces; fluoride-releasing light-activated resin is commonly used.
2. Physical adherence of sealant to enamel surface is done using an acid-etching technique that leaves microspaces between enamel rods.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of sodium hypochlorite on dentin bonding with a polyalkenoic acid-containing adhesive system.
Imani, "A novel dentin bonding system containing poly(methacrylic acid) grafted nanoclay: Synthesis, characterization and properties," Dental Materials, vol.
A number of new dentin bonding systems has been developed and marketed to produce increased bond strength between composite to dentin resulting, best sealing and leak free restoration.
Dentin bonding: SEM comparison of the resin-dentin interface in primary and permanent teeth.
In this system, Gutta Percha melts and gets evenly adapted on to the walls of the root dentin.11 Second factor that helped GP in attaining maximum strength was the use of dentin bonding agent.
One of the main challenges in adhesive dentistry is obtaining a reliable link between composite restorations and dentin, [1] especially with the simplified dentin bonding systems (DBSs) that are considered less technique sensitive and less time consuming, [2,3,4,5] but are usually based on complex hydrophilic monomers that determine higher permeability [6,7] and consequently more rapid degradation in the oral environment.
DISCUSSION: Even though dentin bonding materials are improving and emerging clinical research is encouraging, intact enamel provides the most reliable substrate for etched porcelain restorations.
These, together with other factors, like insufficient hybridization of dentine, pulpal pressure, composite shrinkage and operator errors may lead to microleakage and bond failure in the long term.13 The results of the present survey reflect the awareness of dentists about the shortcomings of dentin bonding in deep class II cavities since majority of dentists didn't bond composite directly to dentine.
The introduction of high strength dentin bonding agents and reliable resin cements will accelerate the progression towards bonded porcelain used in clinical practice.
Some researches advised that resin cements with dentin bonding agents can be used when the length of the post space is less than ideal or when the holes is not rounded and help to overcome retention problems and may fills in the spaces and eliminates the need for a cast post.8,9