dental radiograph


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dental radiograph

Etymology: L, dens, tooth; L, radire, to shine; Gk, graphein, to record
an intraoral and extraoral x-ray film, picture, or image capture of teeth and the bone surrounding them. See also bite wing radiograph, periapical radiograph.

dental radiograph

A radiograph of dental structures made on x-ray film or stored as a digital image. The radiographs may be extraoral or intraoral. Three common types of intraoral dental images are periapical, interproximal, and occlusal radiographs.
See also: radiograph
References in periodicals archive ?
Dental radiographs require imaging of dense tissues such as bone and teeth, as well as soft tissues such as gingiva, making exposure technique challenging.
The approximate half-life of lead in blood is 25 days [2]; as a result, the window for identifying lead exposure following dental radiographs is a few months.
When discussing X-rays and radiation, it is important to note that dental radiographs are the images that are created when X-ray radiation passes through the mouth and strikes a film or digital sensor (these images are often called X-rays for shorthand).
Dental hygienists can have a role during PM dental evidence collection through exposing dental radiographs, taking photographs, surgical assisting, cleaning victim remains of debris, charting examination observations, and cross-checking for quality assurance.
Synthesizing Dental Radiographs for Human Identification, Journal of Dental Research, 2007, Vol.
To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that practice characteristics are significantly associated with receipt of dental radiographs.
The focus of this research study is on commonly encountered stimuli during routine dental visits such as personal protective equipment, hand and power-driven instruments, dental radiographs, needles, air and water spray, and suction.
This involves a careful examination and dental radiographs, often taken by portable X-ray machines.
We know the veterinary market needs dental radiographs that are simple to obtain, outstanding in quality and can go into their existing PACS.
Respondents were evenly split on whether pregnant women could safely receive dental radiographs, although the knowledge about the safety of dental radiographs was also positively associated with years since degree (r=0.