dental radiograph


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dental radiograph

A radiograph of dental structures made on x-ray film or stored as a digital image. The radiographs may be extraoral or intraoral. Three common types of intraoral dental images are periapical, interproximal, and occlusal radiographs.
See also: radiograph
References in periodicals archive ?
Heidmann, "Matching simulated antemortem and postmortem dental radiographs from human skulls by dental students and experts: Testing skills for pattern recognition," Journal of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology, vol.
Dental radiographs require imaging of dense tissues such as bone and teeth, as well as soft tissues such as gingiva, making exposure technique challenging.
The approximate half-life of lead in blood is 25 days [2]; as a result, the window for identifying lead exposure following dental radiographs is a few months.
When discussing X-rays and radiation, it is important to note that dental radiographs are the images that are created when X-ray radiation passes through the mouth and strikes a film or digital sensor (these images are often called X-rays for shorthand).
Therefore it is important to ensure that any radiograph taken must offer net benefit to the health care of the patient.13 Numerous publications have pointed out that many dental radiographs taken are of poor quality to an extent where they are of no diagnostic value.14,15
In conclusion, digitizing conventional dental radiographs using the MD300 USB X-ray Reader produced images with the same clarity and diagnostic quality of conventional radiographs.
Age estimation of adults from dental radiographs. Forensic Sci Int 1995;74:175-85.
The use of dental radiographs: update and recommendations.
(12) Competencies of licensed dental hygienists that make these professionals assets include knowledge of dental root morphology, the intricacies of the oral cavity, dental nomenclature, communication skills, exposing diagnostic quality dental radiographs, and manual dexterity accessing the oral cavity.
3) dental radiographs viewers or accessories (1 Unit)
Despite that, the calcifications present on dental radiographs could be quite often associated with significant carotid diseases.