dental plaque


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Related to dental plaque: dental calculus

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

den·tal plaque

1. the noncalcified accumulation mainly of oral microorganisms and their products that adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged;
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque

den·tal plaque

(den'tăl plak)
1. The noncalcified accumulation, mainly of oral microorganisms and their products, which adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged.
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque.

dental plaque

a thin film of MICROORGANISMS embedded in a matrix of bacterial POLYSACCHARIDES and salivary polymers on the surface of teeth. See also BIOFILM.

den·tal plaque

(den'tăl plak)
1. Noncalcified accumulation mainly of oral microorganisms and their products that adheres tenaciously to the teeth and is not readily dislodged.
2. Synonym(s): bacterial plaque.
References in periodicals archive ?
Higher percentages of students from public schools (72.9%) were ignorant of this term in comparison to private schools (63.5%) and only 17.8% of public school students were aware of the correct meaning of dental plaque compared to 13.5% of private school students.
A substantial benefit was reported in the use of toothbrushes over foam swabs for the removal of dental plaque. (4) The normal adult toothbrush is too large to access the mouth of the intubated patient, so it is advisable to use a soft-bristled 'baby' toothbrush.
Rams: To prevent periodontal disease, it's a two-pronged approach: one, go after the dental plaque bacteria on tooth surfaces with intensive home tooth brushing, flossing and oral irrigation; and two, maintain healthy host resistance by eating a well-balanced, highly nutritional diet, exercising, not smoking, and reducing stress.
With regular dental visits, your dentist can help to keep dental disorders under control by treating any condition that encourages dental plaque.
Flossing should be done at least once a day to make sure food debris and other microbes are removed from the teeth before the dental calculus hardens from dental plaque; it takes about 12 hours or so for the formation of the bacterial matrix to harden.
Due to the abundance of zinc in the human body, some amount may occur naturally in saliva and dental plaque.
The saliva and dental plaque were collected before each gastroscopic examination; i.e.
The most common oral health problems were dental plaque and tartar (calculus), tooth decay (dental caries) and gum (periodontal) disease.
Regular use of antimicrobial mouthrinses can effectively augment the benefits of oral prophylaxis and oral hygiene instructions at 6-month recall intervals in reducing the occurrence of dental plaque and gingivitis.
In univariate analysis, dental plaque, family history of stomach diseases, habit of washing hands before meals and habit of brushing teeth twice daily were associated negatively with H.
About 700 workers were screened from May 19 to July 31 in the first phase, of whom 500 were referred to a dental hygienist for scaling to remove dental plaque and tartar (calculus).
Tartar, or dental plaque -- that film of bacteria that feels like sweaters on your teeth -- contains a wealth of information about what long-dead individuals encountered in their daily lives.