dental pain


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Related to dental pain: toothache

dental pain

Pain in the oral area, which, in general, may be of two origins. Soft tissue pain may be acute or chronic, and a burning pain is due to surface lesions and usually can be discretely localized; pulpal pain or tooth pain varies according to whether it is acute or chronic, but it is often difficult to localize.
See also: pain
References in periodicals archive ?
T Shivakumar et al (21) had 26.6% with halitosis, 5% patients had history of dental pain in our study.
Here we aimed to identify the factors associated with dental pain as an oral health indicator in schoolchildren, aged 6 to 12 years in the state of Hidalgo, Mexico.
Upon the completion of this measure of religious orientation, participants were randomly assigned to think about the Ebola outbreak or about experiencing dental pain. Specifically, we modeled these two primes after previous TMT research (see Pyszczynski, Greenberg, Koole, & Solomon, 2010), in which participants were asked to jot down the emotions aroused in them when they thought about the Ebola outbreak (or about dental pain), and how they would be personally affected (or what would happen to them physically).
"We can only give pain relief and people with dental pain need to go to the dentist, not A&E.
"I am aiming to raise the same amount as I raised last year to help Bridge2Aid with the fantastic work it does in providing dental pain relief and, importantly, in training local healthcare workers so they, ultimately, can provide a sustainable, safe, emergency dental service for their local communities."
This includes hospital emergency room referral programs to connect people with severe dental pain to dentists who can provide needed treatment and expanding programs like Give Kids a Smile, which currently provides dental services to approximately 400,000 underserved children at more than 1,500 events.
Yet one reason people go to emergency rooms with dental pain is that many dentists don't accept Medicaid patients.
(26) The West Haven-Yale Multi-Dimensional Pain Inventory has also shown high internal consistency, but it was invented to assess general pain, not specific dental pain. Therefore, it has not been used frequently in dental studies.
Since acetaminophen has minimal, if any, anti-inflammatory activity, the benefit of using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen, for the control of acute dental pain may outweigh the potential risk to the fetus.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the dental pain in children with intellectual disabilities from a caregiver's perspective.
The former is common following surgeries and as a result of cases such as obstruction of the coronary arteries, renal colic, appendicitis, dental pain, or road traffic injuries.
Single dose analgesic efficacy of tapentadol in postsurgical dental pain: the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.