dental lamina


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den·tal ledge

a band of ectodermal cells growing from the epithelium of the embryonic jaws into the underlying mesenchyme; local buds from the ledge give rise to the primordia of the enamel organs of the teeth.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dental lamina

A flat band of primitive epithelial cells arising from the primary dental band of the mandibular arch and opposed surface of the maxillary process. The tooth buds grow at specific zones along the dental lamina, giving rise to primary and secondary dentition.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

den·tal ledge

(dentăl lej)
Band of ectodermal cells growing from epithelium of the embryonic jaws into underlying mesenchyme; local buds from the ledge give rise to the primordia of the enamel organs of the teeth.
Synonym(s): dental lamina, dental shelf, dentogingival lamina, enamel ledge, primary dental lamina.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The epithelium becomes thickened at the future tooth-forming site and subsequently forms the multilayered epithelium which then contributes to the dental lamina formation.
Gingival cysts are relatively uncommon lesions that may arise due to traumatic implantation of the surface epithelium or from the cystic degeneration of deep projections of the surface epithelium, remnants of the dental lamina, enamel organ, or cell rests of Malassez.
Therefore, this case seems to confirm the theory of hyperactivity of the dental lamina [8] recommending a careful clinical monitoring of the patient.
Shear and Pindborg have suggested that these thickenings represented an example of the odontogenic epithelium establishing original morphology under pathologic conditions, akin to the thickening of stomatodeal ectoderm in the formation of dental lamina during early odontogenesis.
They include heredity, abnormal displacement of the dental lamina in the embryonic life, axial inclination of erupting canines, retention or premature loss of deciduous canine, inadequate eruption space, supernumerary teeth, excessive length of crown, endocrine disorders, trauma, diet and intrauterine defects.
As the most common epithelial odontogenic neoplasm, (1,2) ameloblastoma may arise from dental lamina, developing enamel organ, epithelial lining of an odontogenic cyst or basal cells of oral mucosa.
Various explanations of origin have been proposed, including the basal cells of the oral epithelium, rests of the dental lamina, and the stratum intermedium, as well as reduced enamel epithelium.
Osr2 restricts Bmp4 expression to the tooth mesenchyme under the dental lamina, and in Osr2's absence, Bmp4 gene expression expands into the jaw mesenchyme outside of the tooth row.
Another theory involves the hyperactivity of an anterior part of the dental lamina [Rantanen, 1971].