dental identification


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to dental identification: Forensic odontology, odontologists

dental identification

The use of the unique characteristics of a person's teeth or dental work as recorded in dental charts, radiographs, and records to establish the person's identity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Forensic dental identification is based on the morphological comparison and matching of dental records, mainly available as radiographic images.
They cover mass casualty identification through DNA analysis, technology used for the identification of human remains, dental identification, biological terrorism, forensic engineering, investigations of human rights abuse, forensic entomology, mass disaster litigation, forensic toxicology, and specific cases in Nigeria, West Africa, and Florida.
(2014:235) discusses dental morphology in the section on ancestry estimation but notes, "These dental approaches, while suggesting possible ancestry groups, are not themselves considered sufficient for the estimation of ancestry." A new forensic anthropology text by Langley and Tersigni-Tarrant (2017) contains a chapter on human odontology but only references dental morphology in terms of dental identification, not population variation.
Dental identification is the preferred scientific approach wherein the variation of teeth, jaw bones and sinuses could be exploited to its best use.
The initial project identifications relied largely on dental identifications, with some support from DNA.
Role of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in dental identifications: Because of the resistant nature of dental tissues to environmental assaults, such as incineration, immersion, trauma, mutilation, and decomposition, teeth represent an excellent source of DNA.
Before examination it is pertinent to separate the dental uniqueness used in dental identifications from the uniqueness of human bite marks.
Dental identifications made at this time involved a two-step process, in which the dental officer making the identification did not directly examine the dental remains.