licensure

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licensure

 [li´sen-shur]
the granting of a permit to perform acts which, without it, would be illegal. The licensure of health care personnel traditionally has been the responsibility of the state licensing boards, governed by licensing statutes enacted by the state.
individual licensure the granting of a legal permit that is personal and cannot be transferred to another. The individual seeking the licensure must meet standards for practice as established by the state licensing statutes. In most instances the initial license is granted upon successful completion of an examination administered by the state examining board of the specific profession or vocation, and annual re-registration is required to maintain the license.
institutional licensure licensure of an agency providing a particular service to the public. In the health field the licensure of health care agencies, such as hospitals and clinics, has been common practice for many years.

licensure

The public or governmental regulation of health or other professions for voluntary private-sector programs that attest to the competency of an individual health care practitioner. See License. Cf Certification.

li·cen·sure

(līsĕn-shŭr)
Permission granted to a professional to practice within a jurisdiction.
[L. licentia, fr. licet, it is permitted, + -ure, noun suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this study was to conduct a national survey of dental hygiene program directors to gain their opinions of potential alternative assessments of clinical competency, as qualifications for initial dental hygiene licensure. The results demonstrate that the majority of respondents strongly agreed that the best measures of assuring clinical competence for initial dental hygiene licensure is graduating from a CODA-approved dental hygiene program and passing the national board examination.
* Supporting alternate methods of dental hygiene licensure between states, based on a single standard of education and clinical and didactic evaluation.
This could require anywhere from one to three years of additional education beyond the two to four year degree already required for dental hygiene licensure. Along with additional educational requirements, mid-level providers are often required to practice a number of hours under the supervision of a dentist before they can practice without the presence of a dentist.
Dental hygiene licensure specifications on pain control procedures.
The NBDHE is intended to fulfill or partially fulfill the written examination requirements for state dental hygiene licensure. In fact, Alabama is the only state that does not require a dental hygiene candidate to pass the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination for licensure.
The remaining participants were in careers that did not necessarily require dental hygiene licensure. Positions held by these participants were as follows: flight attendant, writer, artist, dental technician, medical transcriptionist, trainer, real estate, business owner, medical social worker, health information technology, business, procurement manager, paralegal, nurse, researcher, and epidemiology.
New Jersey Senate Bill 670 would allow graduates of foreign dental schools who pass an examination to qualify for dental hygiene licensure.
Increased portability of dental hygiene licensure is an issue in the profession that takes on new meaning as opportunities for career expansion are discussed.
Each of the 10 most agreed upon statements includes a time element in the best way of determining clinical competence prior to dental hygiene licensure. Six of the top seven most agreed with statements included dental hygiene accreditation.
Although until now applicants for Florida dental hygiene licensure had to take a state-administered clinical exam, a pending Florida rule would allow dental hygiene applicants to qualify for licensure if they have taken "the dental hygiene examination developed by the American Board of Dental Examiners, Inc.
(26) They determined that half of the Iowa dental hygienists preferred that dental hygienists control licensure by a separate dental hygiene licensure board.
When a new law drafted by state officials took effect in May permitting applicants for dental hygiene licensure to qualify by passing any American Dental Hygiene Licensing Examination (ADLEX), it effectively authorized the dental board to accept the North East Regional Board (NERB) scores for dental hygienists applying after that date.