dental erosion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to dental erosion: dental abrasion

dental erosion

The wearing away of the surface layer (enamel) of a tooth.
See: abrasion; attrition; bruxism
See also: erosion
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Medications with a low potential of hydrogen (pH) such as aspirin, anti-asthmatic drugs and some mouthwashes may also lead to dental erosion.29
The researcher highlights that dental erosion is a chronic loss of dental hard tissue caused by acid without bacterial involvement -- unlike caries, which is bacteria-related.
Despite the increasing prevalence of these disorders, literature has only few studies evaluating the association between eating disorder risk behavior and dental erosion and caries [5,9].
Dental erosion prevalence seems to be trending higher in recent decades and has become a concern especially when it happens in children and adolescent [5].
In Vitro Study of Dental Erosion associated to Chimo
Dental erosion is defined as an irreversible loss of dental hard tissues by the chemical dissolution process initiated by acids of nonbacterial origin or chelation when the surrounding aqueous phase is undersaturated with respect to tooth mineral [1, 2].
Among the topics are polysaccharide based biomaterials, biopolymers in the prevention of dental erosion, biomedical applications of recombinant proteins and derived polypeptides, high-order perturbation theory models of drug-target interactomes for proteins expressed on networks of hippocampus brain region of Alzheimer disease patients, and the dynamic analysis of backbone-hydrogen-bond propensity for protein binding and drug design.
Even if you chew sugar-free gum, there are still risks to your teeth because sugar-free gum often contains acidic flavourings and preservatives that may lead to dental erosion, even if it contains cavity-fighting xylitol.
Dental erosion can result in dentinal hypersensitivity once the enamel or cementum has been eroded away.
(3,5,6,7,8) Acidic medications may cause dental erosion with loss of dental tissue.