dental anthropology

The use of teeth to compare ancient and modern man, and population groups; similarities and differences in the structure of teeth can be analyzed and their relatedness can be compared

den·tal an·thro·po·lo·gy

(den'tăl an'thrŏ-pol'ŏ-jē)
A branch of physical anthropology concerned with the origin, evolution, and development of the dentitions of primates, especially humans, and to the relationship between primates' dentition and their physical, social, and cultural relationships.

den·tal an·thro·po·lo·gy

(den'tăl an'thrŏ-pol'ŏ-jē)
Branch of physical anthropology concerned with the origin, evolution, and development of dentition of primates, especially humans, and to the relationship between primates' dentition and their physical and social relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 27 dental traits observed, 24 were derived from the Turner-Scott Dental Anthropology System (formerly ASUDAS; Turner et al.
Dental anthropology. Annual Rev of Anthropol, 1988; 17:99-126.
Infante Contreras, "Estudio de la maduraciocn dental y edad dental en individuos con ausencia congenita de dientes permanentes comparados con individuos sin ausencia congenita dental," International Journal of Dental Anthropology, vol.
Analysis of dental morphology in the context of dental anthropology seeks to understand the manner in which the frequency, sexual dimorphism and bilateral symmetry of Tooth Crown Morphological Traits (TCMT) present in deciduous and permanent teeth (1).
Advances in dental anthropology. New York: Wiley-Liss; 1991.
Dental anthropology of Central-Southern, Iron Age Italy: the evidence of metric versus nonmetric traits.
Unos anos mas tarde, este rasgo fue incluido en el sistema de registro de antropologia dental denominado Asudas (Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System) por su nombre en ingles.
Smith, "Standards of human tooth formation and dental age assessment," in Advances in Dental Anthropology, M.
Larsen (eds.), Advances in Dental Anthropology, pp.