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density

 [den´sĭ-te]
1. the ratio of the mass of a substance to its volume.
2. the quality of being compact.
3. the quantity of matter in a given space.
4. the quantity of electricity in a given area, volume, or time.
5. the degree of film blackening in an area of a photograph or radiograph.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

den·si·ty (ρ),

(den'si-tē),
1. The compactness of a substance; the ratio of mass to unit volume, usually expressed as g/cm3 (kg/m3 in the SI).
2. The quantity of electricity on a given surface or in a given time per unit of volume.
3. radiologic physics the opacity to light of an exposed radiographic or photographic film; the darker the film, the greater will be the measured density.
4. clinical radiology a less exposed area on a film, corresponding to a region of greater x-ray attenuation (radiopacity) in the subject; the more light transmitted by the film, the greater the density of the subject will be; this is not actually the opposite of sense 3, because one concerns film density and the other subject density.
[L. densitas, fr. densus, thick]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

density

The amount of a substance per unit volume Imaging
1. The compactness in a scan which reflects the type of tissues seen in CT and MR scans.
2. The amount of 'hard' or mineralized tissue in a plain film. See Bone mineral, Current density, Muscle fiber density, Spin density, Vapor density.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

den·si·ty

, pl. densities (dens'i-tē, -tēz)
1. The compactness of a substance; the ratio of mass to unit volume, usually expressed as g:cm3 (kg:m3 in SI).
2. The quantity of electricity on a given surface or in a given time per unit of volume.
3. radiologic physics The opacity to light of an exposed radiographic or photographic film; the darker the film, the greater the measured density.
4. clinical radiology A less-exposed area on a film, corresponding to a region of greater x-ray attenuation (radiopacity) in the subject; the more light transmitted by the film, the greater the density of the subject; this is not actually the opposite of the sense 3 definition, because one concerns film density and the other subject density.
[L. densitas, fr. densus, thick]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

density

An indication of the compactness of a substance. It is expressed as the ratio of the mass of the substance to its unit volume. The common units are g/cm3 and kg/m3. This property is usually given by lens manufacturers, the greater the density of a material, the greater its weight, all other factors being equal.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

den·si·ty

, pl. densities (dens'i-tē, -tēz)
1. Compactness of a substance.
2. Quantity of electricity on a given surface or in a given time per unit of volume.
3. radiologic physics opacity to light of an exposed radiographic or photographic film; the darker the film, the greater the measured density.
4. clinical radiology a less exposed area on a film, corresponding to a region of greater x-ray attenuation (radiopacity) in the subject.
[L. densitas, fr. densus, thick]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about density

Q. what are the sources for high density lipoprotein? I have heard that high density lipoprotein is good for heart. What differences does it make in heart’s health and what are the sources for high density lipoprotein?

A. Hi Liam, it is very important that we have high density lipoprotein (HDL) in our body. The fact is that the HDL is formed inside the body. They are known as good cholesterol as they are famous for their protection for heart against the heart diseases. It has been found that Vitamin B3 or Niacin consumption increases the count of HDL. It’s good to cut on the diet having more of saturated fats and oils, which increases the chances of heart attack.

More discussions about density
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the application of a uniform density model systematically underestimates the sediment densities at deeper sections.
Effects of different plant densities on seed weight showed that with increasing plant density from 7 to 10 plants [m.sup.-2] the seed weight decreased significantly (Fig 4 and Table 1).
Though its traditional city boundaries demarcate an area of 289 sq km in which 6.5 million people live at very high residential densities, most of Shanghai's territory is now considered urbanised and reaches an average density of 2900 per sq km, arranged in a seemingly chaotic patchwork of agricultural, residential and industrial land uses.
A few descriptions apply only if densities fall within a specified range.
Once engineered, it is a technology that should be easily and economically replicated, adding no significant cost to the drive and potentially improving areal densities by another factor of 10.
(2002b) modeled the relationship between counts of spawning females and egg densities within beach segments.
(The researchers suspect their study was underpowered to detect similar results in the white population.) Interestingl y, the bone densities were similar among the active and inactive premenopausal groups.
In 2000, Staten Island, New York, reported 10 human West Nile virus cases and high densities of dead crows.
All reefs had roughly similar adult densities (Table 1, overall mean density = 0.24 fish/[m.sup.2]).
Efforts to control prairie dog populations have resulted in towns of different sizes and different prairie dog densities (Fagerstone, 1981; Daley, 1992).
The results showed that the effect of planting densities was significant on grain yield, in P [less than or equal to] 0.05.
Two microsphere product lines having densities of 1.065 g/cc and 1.075 g/cc are currently in stock and ready for shipment.