denial


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Related to denial: Defense mechanisms

denial

 [dĕ-ni´al]
in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is denied and kept out of conscious awareness. By keeping the stressors out of consciousness, they are prevented from causing anxiety.
ineffective denial a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as denial that is detrimental to health when a person makes a conscious or unconscious attempt to disavow the meaning or even the knowledge of an event in order to reduce anxiety or fear.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl),
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
Synonym(s): negation
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]

denial

/de·ni·al/ (dĭ-ni´il) in psychiatry, a defense mechanism in which the existence of unpleasant internal or external realities is kept out of conscious awareness.

denial

(dĭ-nī′əl)
n.
1. A refusal to comply with or satisfy a request.
2. Abstinence; self-denial.

denial

[dinī′əl]
Etymology: L, denegare, to negate
1 refusal or restriction of something requested, claimed, or needed, often causing physical or emotional deficiency.
2 an unconscious defense mechanism in which emotional conflict and anxiety are avoided by refusal to acknowledge those thoughts, feelings, desires, impulses, or facts that are consciously intolerable.

denial

Psychiatry A primitive–ego defense–mechanism by which a person unconsciously negates the existence of a disease or other stress-producing reality in his environment, by disavowing thoughts, feelings, wishes, needs, or external reality factors that are consciously intolerable. See In denial.

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts or troublesome impulses.
Synonym(s): negation.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denego, to say no]

de·ni·al

(dĕ-nī'ăl)
An unconscious defense mechanism used to allay anxiety by denying the existence of important conflicts, troublesome impulses, events, actions, or illness.
[M.E., fr, O.Fr., fr. L. denegare, to say no]
References in periodicals archive ?
When someone identifies the obvious, Trump resounds the beat of denial as he did before he was president: "I'm the least racist person that you've ever met," that "you've ever seen," that "you've ever encountered.
Where possible, key drivers of denial activity should be identified and addressed.
To place denial in the context of organizations and organizational leadership, at the minimum we need a working definition as a jumping-off point for our discussion.
This discretion at the regional level led to provincial differences in the denial rates for CPP disability benefits as some provinces had high denial rates and others smaller denial rates (Torjman, 2002).
The Power Mac G4 Cube computer exemplifies several of these characteristics, including denial of historicity and of waste.
Standard economic reasoning suggests that in deciding whether to file a claim, the insured individual takes into account this possibility of denial, along with any costs in terms of time and trouble imposed on him or her by the screening process through which the insurer makes the denial decision.
It would be easy to see this as normal human denial, to say that some of us genuinely believe we need to get past a "crisis" mentality about AIDS, that some are simply honest skeptics about research, that some deeply believe in a media conspiracy to "demonize" gay sex, and that all these denials--as dangerous and myopic as they are--are understandable, excusable, all too human.
The issue was whether the Tax Court had jurisdiction to review the IRS's denial of Sec.
denial, religiosity, fighting spirit, information seeking)
The study's objectives are to determine mortgage denial rates by lender type and race of the applicant; to test whether denial rates are higher for blacks relative to whites for primes and subprimes; and to test whether there is a difference between prime-lender black denial rates versus subprime-lender black denial rates.
Rudi Dornbush, a noted MIT economist who watches foreign markets, opines: "European policymakers are torn between common sense and a myopic denial of reality.