dengue hemorrhagic fever


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Related to dengue hemorrhagic fever: Dengue Shock Syndrome

den·gue

(den'gā),
A disease of many tropic and subtropic regions that can occur epidemically; caused by dengue virus, a member of the family Flaviviridae. There are four antigenic types, and they are transmitted by a mosquito of the genus Aedes (usually A. aegypti, but frequently A. albopictus). Four grades of severity are recognized: grade I, fever and constitutional symptoms; grade II, grade I with spontaneous bleeding (of skin, gums, or gastrointestinal tract); grade III, grade II with agitation and circulatory failure; grade IV, profound shock.
[Sp. corruption of "dandy" fever]

den·gue

, dengue hemorrhagic fever , dengue fever (deng'ē, hem'ŏr-aj'ik fē'vĕr)
A disease of tropic and subtropic regions, caused by dengue virus and transmitted by a mosquito of the genus Aedes. Four grades of severity are recognized: grade I, fever and constitutional symptoms; grade II, spontaneous bleeding (of skin, gums, or gastrointestinal tract); grade III, agitation and circulatory failure; and grade IV, profound shock.
[Sp. corruption of "dandy" fever]

dengue hemorrhagic fever

Abbreviation: DHF
A grave sequela of dengue, marked by fever, headache, myalgia, arthralgias, rash, spontaneous bleeding, increased blood vessel permeability to proteins, and low platelet counts (< 100,000/mm3).
See also: fever
References in periodicals archive ?
Dengue hemorrhagic fever: Diagnosis, treatment prevention and control.
Epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever. In: Gubler DJ and Kuno G, editors.
A comparison of the pattern of liver involvement in dengue hemorrhagic fever with classic dengue fever.
Dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemiology in Thailand: description and forecasting of epidemics.
In most patients, dengue fever resolves without hemo-concentration, an indication of dengue hemorrhagic fever. Nosocomial transmission of dengue viruses is not a common event, however, physicians must consider these diseases.
After World War II, dengue hemorrhagic fever also spread to Southeast Asia and affected the Caribbean and Latin America in 1980 (Gubler and Clark, 1995).
When treated, dengue hemorrhagic fever has a mortality rate of 2-5%, but when left untreated, the mortality rate may approach up-to 50%, he added.
The spectrum of illness ranges from a mild self-limiting illness to dengue fever (DF), in severe cases, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS).2 Annually 24000 deaths have been attributed to Dengue with continuous surge in numbers each successive year.3
According to report issued by Dengue Prevention, Control and Management Program for Sindh here on Friday a total of 2418 dengue fever cases were registered in 2016 with two dengue hemorrhagic fever induced deaths during the entire year.
Standardized clinical management: evidence of reduction of dengue hemorrhagic fever case fatality rate in Thailand.
Research variables were Dengue non-hemorrhagic and Dengue hemorrhagic fever. Blood samples were collected from non-hemorrhagic dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever patients.
"These include dengue hemorrhagic fever, a rare complication characterised by high fever, damage to lymph and blood vessels, bleeding from the nose and gums, enlargement of the liver, and failure of the circulatory system.