dendrite

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Related to dendritic process: axodendritic

dendrite

 [den´drīt]
any of the threadlike extensions of the cytoplasm of a neuron; they typically branch into treelike processes, and compose most of the receptive surface of a neuron.
Dendrites in a multipolar neuron. From Dorland's, 2000.

den·drite

(den'drīt),
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon). Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite, neurodendron
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]

dendrite

(dĕn′drīt′)
n.
1.
a. A mineral crystallizing in another mineral in the form of a branching or treelike mark.
b. A rock or mineral bearing such a mark or marks.
2. A branched protoplasmic extension of a nerve cell that conducts impulses from adjacent cells inward toward the cell body. A single nerve may possess many dendrites. Also called dendron.

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon).
Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]

dendrite

(den'drit?) [Gr. dendrites, pert. to a tree]
Enlarge picture
DENDRITES
A short spike-shaped cell process. The term usually refers to the branched, tapering cell processes of neurons. Incoming synapses form on the neuronal dendrites, which often arborize, sometimes extensively. Synonym: dendron See: illustration

extracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that pierces the capsule surrounding the cell and extends for a considerable distance from the cell body.

intracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that branches beneath the capsule of the ganglion, forming a network about the cell body.
dendritic (den-drit'ik), adjective

dendrite

One of the usually numerous branches of a nerve cell that carry impulses toward the cell body. Dendrites allow the most complex interconnection between nerve cells, as in the brain, so that elaborate control arrangements over the passage of nerve impulses are made possible. Recent research suggests that sections of some dendrites can function independently.

dendrite

or

dendron

a projection from the nerve cell which branches and conducts impulses towards the cell body from other neurones with which they have SYNAPSES. See NEURON, AXON and Fig. 228 .

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell.
Synonym(s): neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus photoreceptors are expected in these stages, and we find in both stages a multilamellar dendritic process with a structure and location identical to that of the mature female, although the dendritic process of J4 has less extensive lamellae.
Exposure to these estrogenic compounds not only diminished the number of melanocytes per embryo but also altered the appearance of dendritic processes of these pigmented cells in comparison to saline- or vehicle-treated embryos (Figures 4A,B and 5A,B).
A neural origin is supported by expression of neuron-specific enolase and CD57 with ultrastructural findings of occasional dendritic processes and dense-core granules.[3] Factors that argue against a neural origin include negative staining for synaptophysin, chromogranin, and neurofilament protein.