dendrite


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Related to dendrite: axon

dendrite

 [den´drīt]
any of the threadlike extensions of the cytoplasm of a neuron; they typically branch into treelike processes, and compose most of the receptive surface of a neuron.
Dendrites in a multipolar neuron. From Dorland's, 2000.

den·drite

(den'drīt),
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon). Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite, neurodendron
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]

dendrite

(dĕn′drīt′)
n.
1.
a. A mineral crystallizing in another mineral in the form of a branching or treelike mark.
b. A rock or mineral bearing such a mark or marks.
2. A branched protoplasmic extension of a nerve cell that conducts impulses from adjacent cells inward toward the cell body. A single nerve may possess many dendrites. Also called dendron.

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell (the other being the axon).
Synonym(s): dendritic process, dendron, neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]

dendrite

(den'drit?) [Gr. dendrites, pert. to a tree]
Enlarge picture
DENDRITES
A short spike-shaped cell process. The term usually refers to the branched, tapering cell processes of neurons. Incoming synapses form on the neuronal dendrites, which often arborize, sometimes extensively. Synonym: dendron See: illustration

extracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that pierces the capsule surrounding the cell and extends for a considerable distance from the cell body.

intracapsular dendrite

A dendrite of a neuron of autonomic ganglia that branches beneath the capsule of the ganglion, forming a network about the cell body.
dendritic (den-drit'ik), adjective

dendrite

One of the usually numerous branches of a nerve cell that carry impulses toward the cell body. Dendrites allow the most complex interconnection between nerve cells, as in the brain, so that elaborate control arrangements over the passage of nerve impulses are made possible. Recent research suggests that sections of some dendrites can function independently.

dendrite

or

dendron

a projection from the nerve cell which branches and conducts impulses towards the cell body from other neurones with which they have SYNAPSES. See NEURON, AXON and Fig. 228 .

den·drite

(den'drīt)
1. One of the two types of branching protoplasmic processes of the nerve cell.
Synonym(s): neurodendrite.
2. A crystalline treelike structure formed during the freezing of an alloy.
[G. dendritēs, relating to a tree]
References in periodicals archive ?
With an ordinary separator, they found that dendrites contact and penetrate the separator with no change in voltage, leading to battery failure.
The test revealed thatEethe tangled-nanotube film effectively destroyed dendrites over 580 charge/discharge cycles of a test battery when used with a sulfurised-carbon cathode.
Harnett's hypothesis is that because of these differences, which allow more regions of a dendrite to influence the strength of an incoming signal, individual neurons can perform more complex computations on the information.
Thus, [alpha] grains have enough time to grow up and engulf many original Nb-rich [alpha] grain boundaries or Al-rich dendrite boundaries, leading to coarse-sized lamellar colony containing vermiform bands with different contrasts.
Spano, "Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonists increase dendrite arborization of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons via extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation," The European Journal of Neuroscience, vol.
The research shows how dendrites can break through the barriers in different segments of a battery, which ultimately causes a short circuit.
During soot accumulation bias was decreased by 40V in a step-wise manner or was removed in order to affect the soot dendrites through variation in electric forces.
Moreover, we have shown [4] that considerable part of iron concentrating in the so-called chemically unstable phase (CUP) is removed at etching and forms the randomly oriented dendrite net of channels.
The x-axis represents the applied controlling strain (i.e., the displacement normalized with the "box" dimensions so as to have the physical significance of infinitesimal strain), [[epsilon].sub.2]; this variable is normalized further with the rupture strain of the basic dendrite material, [[epsilon].sub.bf].
The immunohistochemical technique for MAP-2 used in this work allowed us to delineate the microtubules in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons, from layers II to V of the cerebral cortex of mice, in the two areas of the motor cortex that were evaluated.
To measure the dendrite arm spacings in several samples from the metal/mold interface to region columnar zone the samples were analyzed in an optical microscope Neophot--32, using the method described by Gunduz and Cadirli (2002).