denature


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denature

(dē-nā′chər)
tr.v. dena·tured, dena·turing, dena·tures
1. To change the nature or natural qualities of.
2. To render unfit to eat or drink without destroying usefulness in other applications, especially to add methanol to (ethyl alcohol).
3. Biochemistry
a. To cause the tertiary structure of (a protein) to unfold, as with heat, alkali, or acid, so that some of its original properties, especially its biological activity, are diminished or eliminated.
b. To cause the paired strands of (double-stranded DNA) to separate into individual single strands.

de·na′tur·ant n.
de·na′tur·a′tion n.

denature

(dē-nā′chŭr) [ de- + nature]
1. In chemistry, to change the qualities of a substance, esp. to make alcohol (ethyl alcohol) unfit to drink by adding an unpleasant ingredient, e.g. methanol.
2. In biochemistry, to make a change in conditions (temperature, addition of a substance) that causes an irreversible change in the structure of a protein, usually resulting in precipitation of the protein.
2. In genetics, to separate double-stranded DNA into two complementary strands, usually with heat.
denatured (′chŭrd), adjectivedenaturation (dē″nā″chŭ-rā′shŏn)

denature

to deprive a substance of its natural qualities, e.g. by heating a protein to destroy its specific biological activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denature feel that the fact they are doing something a bit different to the majority of local acts has gone down well with North East audiences, and they hope that people will be impressed with the tracks on their new EP.
Sample Cases: The Globalization Strategy Denatures Small Business
At 45 degrees C, blood denatures, it cooks on to instruments and becomes highly insolvent, making removal very difficult.
While their functionality jeopardizes their status as art, the drawings' homemade appearance-their uneven washes of color and sinuously drawn texts-effectively denatures the machine-made look of gallery advertising.
A) Double-stranded DNA denatures at high temperatures.