demyelination


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Related to demyelination: vasculitis, Demyelinating diseases

demyelination

 [de-mi´ĕ-lin-a´shun]
destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves. Called also demyelinization and myelinolysis.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, dē-mī'ĕ-lin-i-za'shŭn),
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts. Central demyelination occurs within the central nervous system (for example, the demyelination seen with multiple sclerosis); peripheral demyelination affects the peripheral nervous system (for example, the demyelination seen with Guillain-Barré syndrome).

demyelination

/de·my·elin·a·tion/ (de-mi″ĕ-lĭ-na´shun) destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves. Called also myelinolysis.

demyelination

[dimī′əlinā′shən]
Etymology: L, de + Gk, myelos, marrow
the process of destruction or removal of the myelin sheath from a nerve or nerve fiber.
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Process of demyelination

demyelination

Demyelinization Neurology A condition in which nerve trunks are not myelinated ab initio–eg, leukodystrophy or which suffer loss after myelinization has been completed–eg, myelinoclasia. See Leukodystrophy.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, -ī-zā'shŭn)
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts. Central demyelination occurs within the central nervous system (e.g., the demyelination seen with multiple sclerosis); peripheral demyelination affects the peripheral nervous system (e.g., the demyelination seen with Guillain-Barré syndrome).

demyelination

Loss of the insulating fatty sheath (myelin) of nerve fibres. This usually occurs in a patchy manner. Local areas of demyelination, in the form of ‘plaques’ which extend across large numbers of nerve fibre bundles, is the hallmark of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. Also known as demyelinization.

Demyelination

Disruption or destruction of the myelin sheath, leaving a bare nerve. Results in a slowing or stopping of impulses traveling along that nerve.

demyelination

loss or destruction of myelin sheath surrounding nerves, with associated loss of effective nerve impulse conduction; characteristic of demyelinating diseases

demyelination,

n breakdown of the myelin sheaths covering nerves and nerve fibers.
Enlarge picture
Demyelination.

de·my·e·li·na·tion

, demyelinization (dē-mī'e-lin-ā'shŭn, -ī-zā'shŭn, dē-mīĕ-li-nāshŭn, -lin-ī-zāshŭn)
Loss of myelin with preservation of the axons or fiber tracts.

demyelination

destruction, removal, or loss of the myelin sheath of a nerve or nerves.
References in periodicals archive ?
In agreement with our pathological studies revealing less inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in CS-treated mice than controls, these results indicated the therapeutic potential of this agent in the treatment of MS.
Central pontine and extra-pontine myelinolysis: the osmotic demyelination syndromes.
The researchers then cautioned against using resveratrol for human inflammatory demyelination diseases like MS.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterised by inflammation, demyelination, and axonal degeneration.
Could you tackle the controversy over rabies vaccines and demyelination in dogs?
Citation: "iPSC-derived neural precursors exert a neuroprotective role in immune-mediated demyelination via the secretion of L1F"; Cecilia Laterza et al.
Mice treated with older donor cells had increased inflammation of the central nervous system, demyelination leading to an impairment in movement, cognition and other functions dependent on nerves, and a proliferation of spenocytes (white blood cells in the spleen), compared to the mice receiving cells from younger donors," Dr.
The rapid overcorrection of sodium (10 mmol/L in the first 12 h) increased the risk of osmotic demyelination because complications have been noted if the serum sodium change is >0.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory neurological disorder characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal transection and neurodegeneration within the central nervous system.
Only 20% of children with a first-time attack of demyelination will eventually go on to have a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.
Some pathologic processes that can cause an elevation of choline include neoplasm, ischemia, and acute demyelination.