demulcent


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demulcent

 [de-mul´sent]
1. soothing; bland.
2. a soothing mucilaginous or oily medicine or application.

de·mul·cent

(dĕ-mŭl'sent),
1. Soothing; relieving irritation.
2. An agent, such as a mucilage or oil, that soothes and relieves irritation, especially of the mucous surfaces.
[L. de-mulceo, pp. -mulctus, to stroke lightly, to soften]

demulcent

/de·mul·cent/ (de-mul´sint)
1. soothing; bland.
2. a soothing mucilaginous or oily medicine or application.

demulcent

(dĭ-mŭl′sənt)
adj.
Serving to soothe or soften.
n.
A soothing, usually mucilaginous or oily substance, such as glycerin or lanolin, used especially to relieve pain in inflamed or irritated mucous membranes.

demulcent

[dimul′sənt]
Etymology: L, demulcere, to stroke down
1 n, any of several oily substances used for soothing and reducing irritation of surfaces that have been abraded or irritated, especially mucosal surfaces.
2 adj, soothing, as a counterirritant or balm.

demulcent

Herbal medicine
A herb that soothes, softens and protects mucous membranes through a medical or mechanical effect; demulcents include chickweed (Stellaria media), coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara), comfrey (Symphytum officinale), Irish moss (Chrondrus crispus), marshmallow (Althaea officinalis), slippery elm (Ulmus fulva).

demulcent

Pharmacology A protective, often viscid preparation, used to alleviate irritation of mucous membranes or abraded skin; by providing a rapid cover, the effects of local mechanical, chemical or bacterial irritants are diminished, as is pain and spasms, and drying prevented. See Binding agent.

de·mul·cent

(dĕ-mŭl'sĕnt)
1. Soothing; relieving irritation.
2. An agent, such as a mucilage or oil, that soothes and relieves irritation, especially of the mucous surfaces.
[L. de-mulceo, pp. -mulctus, to stroke lightly, to soften]

demulcent

1. Soothing.
2. An oily substance used to relieve pain or discomfort in inflamed, irritated or abraded skin or mucous membranes.

de·mul·cent

(dĕ-mŭl'sĕnt)
1. Soothing; relieving irritation.
2. An agent that relieves irritation.
[L. de-mulceo, pp. -mulctus, to stroke lightly, to soften]

demulcent

1. soothing; bland.
2. a soothing mucilaginous or oily medicine or application.

alimentary demulcent
substances of high molecular mass and good solubility that lubricate, coat and protect the mucosa of the upper alimentary tract. Usually they mask unpleasant tastes, stabilize emulsions, and act as suspension agents. Methyl cellulose, gum tragacanth, agar, mineral oil and propylene glycol are used for this purpose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, they wrote, honey's "topical demulcent effect may contribute to its benefits for cough as postulated by the World Health Organization review.
It is popular among patients with inflammatory bowel disease, with effects that are thought to derive from its demulcent properties.
Why Honey is a demulcent, which means it creates a fine coating of a mucus-like substance on contact with skin.
Instead it uses pectin, a widely used demulcent that leaves a soothing coating in the throat.
then give demulcent Carbon monoxide Oxygen Iron Deferoxamine Mercury BAL (British anti-lewisite) Methyl alcohol Ethyl alcohol Nitrites Methylene blue Opiates, Darvon, Naloxone
Hmmmmm, oh, the madness of flesh, it's faithful familiarity, the everturning appetite, licking wounds until they're graceful as resurrection, the way we'd glance shyly at each other when we rose or after rubbing one another's feet; one demulcent hand figuring out another thought, another tempting gift from yesterday into tomorrow past the absence of now, the voices of the hummingbird above my head like a halo, soprano, everyone hearing but me.
Medicinally, the oil is known as a demulcent (a substance capable of soothing abraded mucus membranes) and a emollient (soothing to the skin).
The polymer-mucin interaction stabilizes and rebuilds the tear film by forming a scaffolding system, allowing water and the product's demulcent active ingredients to be retained on the cornea.
Slippery elm bark (Ulmus rubra or Ulmus fulva) ianother demulcent often used to relieve symptoms of pharyngitis.
Traditionally milk thistle has been used for disorders of the liver, spleen and gallbladder, to stimulate milk production in lactating mothers, for haemorrhoids, for dyspepsia and as a demulcent for catarrah and pleurisy.
Trigonella Actions that may support Reportedly used foenum- galactagogue effect: in ancient Egypt graecum Demulcent as a galactagogue (fenugreek) Diaphoretic (Toppo 2009).