demotivate


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demotivate

(dē-mō′tĭ-vāt)
To cause loss of incentive or motivation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Black said: "I would argue that your idea actually demotivates people." She said that after 12 weeks in work the person would return to being unemployed.
Speaking at the inauguration of the Summit of the Heads of State & Government of the South-East European Cooperation Process in Kishinev, Moldova, Erdogan said, "we particularly expect EU countries to carefully refrain from statements and actions that will demotivate regional countries towards accession."
Identify factors that demotivate staff--they may be physical (buildings, equipment), or psychological (boredom, unfairness, barriers to promotion, lack of recognition).
Subtle snubs, flippant gestures and sarcastic tones, even in small quantities, demoralise and demotivate people.
However, opposition members were of the view that the bills would be used inappropriately and demotivate investment in the state.
The YDA Punjab has rejected the proposed law as, according to them, it will only demotivate them.
ISLAMABAD -- Senator Dr Ashok Kumar of National Party Tuesday said that terrorists could not demotivate the nation and diminish its determination in the war against terrorism.
"Not paying them the full minimum wage will demotivate younger adults."
" Labour opposition leader Nick Kemp said he was concerned that "downgrading the post of youth worker and giving them a pay cut of thousands of pounds a year will demotivate staff" and "lead to a further reduction in the quality of what's offered to the city's young people".
"If they don''t eat and drink properly they get dehydrated and weak, and if they are isolated, loneliness and depression can demotivate them."
This study is interested in identifying and exploring what motivate or demotivate learners from completing a self-directed online course, which have implications for designing motivating online learning environments.