demoniac

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de·mo·ni·ac

(dĕ-mō'nē-ak), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in come contexts.
Frenzied, fiendish, as if possessed by evil spirits.
[G. daimōn, a spirit]

demoniac

(dĕ-mŏ′nē-ak″)
1. Concerning or resembling a demon.
2. Frenzied, as if possessed by demons or evil spirits.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In an attempt to quell the demoniacal atmosphere which he felt centered around the music in his parish, he had all the pipes and fiddles gathered up and burned (1989: 25).
44) Therefore, rather than guaranteeing Mallarme's ambition for an 'oeuvre pure', implying 'la disparition elocutoire du poete, qui cede l'initiative aux mots', 'Le Demon de l'analogie', in giving sway to 'the chances of sound-effects' under 'the pressure of the demoniacal urge to "rhyme"', bears the traces of the two projects in which the poet himself was engaged.
Such renunciations, however, are always already degraded to mere performance--except, that is, for the one that takes place at the end of the film: after Miles's demoniacal boss Herb Myerson hires asthmatic hitman Wheezy Joe to kill Marylin; after Miles, unexpectedly wealthy upon the sudden death of Rex Rexroth, sets out to stop Wheezy Joe; and after Marylin, still married to Miles and unprotected by the Massey, hires Wheezy Joe to kill Miles; Miles and Marylin return to the bargaining table in an attempt to divorce one another amicably.
The latter transported European discourse of demoniacal witchcraft to the Caribbean with his novel Le Zombi du Grand-Perou, published in 1696 and the first colonial novel in French.
Lovett, a fright with a fondness for both a demoniacal barber and a street waif.
But they have the same arresting energy, black humour and grotesque artistic effects as Jorn, and similar roots in the more or less demoniacal underground art that has always existed in the Western world.
Bullen conjures some striking motifs, with demoniacal scutterings and low, swampy snarls.
12) Intellectual reflection is not what poems like the Corsair and the Bride of Abydos are about, Francis Jeffrey argued in 1814; they picture instead "the stronger passions," feelings that "enchant and agonise" readers' minds, providing alternately "divine inspiration, or demoniacal possession.
Hugo organizes his narrative as a flashback: D'Auverney, a captain in the republican army tells the story of Bug-Jargal, the demoniacal fool Habibrah, and the devious revolutionary leader Biassou.
Grieve quotes from Herbarium of Apuleius, For witlessness, that is the devil sickness of demoniacal possession, take from the body of this said wort mandrake by weight of three pennies, administer to drink in warm water as he might find most convenient--soon he will be healed.
Michael Heyd scrutinizes the motives for Christians to call Sabbetai Tzvi a "Jewish Quaker"; they opposed his movement as an enthusiasm that resulted either from deceit or demoniacal influence.
The insight proves to no avail, however: though he had the makings of a genuine rebel, "who knew the demoniacal and declared against it, a man on the side of men" (301), Carl's fellowship ideal became corrupted when he vowed vengeance on Jud.