carrier

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carrier

 [kar´e-er]
1. an individual who harbors the specific organisms of a disease without manifest symptoms and is capable of transmitting the infection; the condition of such an individual is referred to as the carrier state.
2. in genetics, an individual who is heterozygous for a recessive gene and thus does not express the recessive phenotype but can transmit it to offspring. Only females can be carriers of X-linked recessive traits.
3. a substance that carries a radioisotopic or other label, as in a tracer study. A second isotope mixed with a particular isotope is also referred to as a carrier. See also carrier-free.
4. a transport protein that carries specific substances, e.g., in the blood or across cell membranes.
5. in immunology, a macromolecular substance to which a hapten is coupled in order to produce an immune response against the hapten. immune responses are usually produced only against large molecules capable of simultaneously binding both B cells and helper T cells.

car·ri·er

(ka'rē-er),
1. A person who or animal that harbors a specific infectious agent in the absence of discernible clinical disease and serves as a potential source of infection.
See also: label, tracer.
2. Any chemical capable of accepting an atom, radical, or subatomic particle from one compound, then passing it to another; for example, cytochromes are electron carriers; homocysteine is a methyl carrier.
See also: label, tracer.
3. A substance that, by having chemical properties closely related to or indistinguishable from those of a radioactive tracer, is thus able to carry the tracer through a precipitation or similar chemical procedure; the best carriers are the nonradioactive isotopes of the tracer in question.
See also: label, tracer.
4. A large immunogen (usually a protein) that, when coupled to a hapten, facilitates an immune response to the hapten.
5. A component of a membrane that causes the transfer of a substance from one side of the membrane to the other.
6. The mobile phase in chromatography.
7. A component of a biologic fluid that binds a ligand and transports that ligand to a ne wlocation.

carrier

/car·ri·er/ (kar´e-er)
1. one who harbors disease organisms in their body without manifest symptoms, thus acting as a distributor of infection.
2. a heterozygote, i.e., one who carries a recessive gene and thus does not express the recessive phenotype but can transmit it to offspring.
3. a chemical substance that can accept electrons and then donate them to another substance (being reduced and then reoxidized).
4. a substance that carries a radioisotopic or other label; also used for a second isotope mixed with a particular isotope (see carrier-free ).
6. in immunology, a macromolecular substance to which a hapten is coupled in order to produce an immune response against the hapten.

carrier

(kăr′ē-ər)
n.
1. A mechanism or device by which something is conveyed or conducted.
2. Medicine A person or animal that shows no symptoms of a disease but harbors the infectious agent of that disease and is capable of transmitting it to others.
3. Genetics An individual that carries one gene for a particular recessive trait. A carrier does not express the trait but, when mated with another carrier, can produce offspring that do.
4. An insurance or underwriting organization.

carrier

[ker′ē·ər]
Etymology: OFr, carier
1 a person or animal who harbors and can potentially spread an organism that causes disease in others but does not become ill.
2 one whose chromosomes carry a recessive gene.
3 an immunogenic molecule or part of a molecule that is recognized by T cells in an antibody response.
An individual who possesses one copy of a mutant allele that causes disease only when 2 copies are present; carriers are not affected by the disease. The mating of 2 carriers can result in a child who has a disease that follows simple mendelian genetics

carrier

Epidemiology A person or animal without apparent disease who harbors a specific pathogen can transmit it to others; the carrier state may occur in a person with an asymptomatic infection–asymptomatic carrier, or during the incubation period, convalescence, and postconvalescence of a person with clinically recognizable disease; the carrier state may be of
short or long duration–transient or chronic. See Latent carrier, Silent carrier Genetics A state in which a person has a gene known to be linked to a particular condition, who does not manifest the disease; in humans the classic carrier state is that of a ♀ with a defective gene on the X chromosome, which does not manifest itself in ♀ with 2 X chromosomes–one of which is presumed to be normal–for a particular condition Infectious disease A person infected with a bug, who can act as a 'vector' and transmit the infection to others but is asymptomatic Types Silent carriers–eg with TB, retain infectiousness; latent carriers–eg those with HSV are not infectious. See Typhoid Mary Managed care
1. An organization–eg, an insurance company, with an HCFA contract to administer claims processing and make Medicare payments to health care providers for Medicare Part B benefits. See Fiscal Intermediary, Part B.
2. A private contractor that administers claims processing and payment for Medicare Part B services. See Supplementary Medical Insurance Obstetrics A surrogate mother who is carrying a gestational product to term. See Gestational carrier Pharmacology A peptide, protein, or other substance that binds to a therapeutic agent, and transports it in the circulation. See Vehicle.

car·ri·er

(kar'ē-ĕr)
1. A person or animal harboring a specific infectious agent in the absence of clinical disease symptoms and serving as a potential source of infection.
2. Any chemical capable of accepting an atom, radical, or subatomic particle from one compound, then passing it to another.
3. A substance that, by having chemical properties closely related to or indistinguishable from those of a radioactive tracer, is able to carry the tracer through a precipitation or similar chemical procedure.
See also: label, tracer
4. A large immunogen that when coupled to a hapten facilitates an immune response to the hapten.
5. In the U.S., a private health care insurance company that has a contract with Medicare to pay Medicare part B claims.
6. A business entity that provides health care benefits to individuals or other businesses.

carrier

1. A person permanently or temporarily immune to a disease-producing organism (pathogen) which is present in his or her body, and which can be passed on, directly or indirectly, to others. A person who carries infectious organisms without ever having suffered the disease is known as a ‘casual carrier’.
2. A person with one normal and one affected gene (heterozygous) for a condition which is expressed only if both genes bear the defect for the condition (recessive inheritance). Such a person does not show the condition but can pass on the gene to an offspring who could inherit the other gene from the other parent.
3. Any molecule that, by attaching itself to a non-immunogenic molecule, can provide EPITOPES for helper T cells thus making the second molecule immunogenic. See also TYPHOID CARRIER.

carrier

  1. an individual plant or animal that is infected with pathogenic organisms internally or externally without showing signs of disease, and which is capable of transferring them to others, thus causing disease. For example, typhoid carriers harbour bacteria in the gall bladder and these enter the gut in the bile and are excreted.
  2. an individual with a GENOTYPE containing a deleterious recessive gene such as that for PHENYLKETONURIA, that does not show in the PHENOTYPE.

Carrier

A person who has a genetic defect but does not develop any symptoms or signs of the defect. The carrier's offspring may inherit the defect and develop the associated disorder.

carrier

individual with asymptomatic contagious infection, forming a source of disease without showing any signs of that disease, e.g. carriers of Staphylococcus aureus , hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

car·ri·er

(kar'ē-ĕr)
Being that harbors a specific infectious agent in the absence of discernible clinical disease and serves as a potential source of infection.

carrier,

n 1. a person harboring a specific infectious agent without clinical evidence of disease and who serves as a potential source or reservoir of infection for others. May be a healthy or convalescent carrier.
n 2. the party of the dental plan contract who agrees to pay claims or provide service. Also called
insurer, underwriter, and
administrative agent. See also third party.
carrier, amalgam,
n an instrument used to carry plastic amalgam to the prepared cavity or mold into which it is to be inserted.
carrier, foil,

carrier

1. an animal which harbors a disease organism in its body without manifest signs, thus acting as a carrier or distributor of infection. A carrier may be one with a latent infection and which appears healthy. Other types of carriers are the incubatory carrier, when the animal is not yet showing clinical signs, or a convalescent carrier when it has passed the clinical stage.
2. a heterozygote, i.e. an animal which carries a recessive gene, autosomal or sex-linked, together with its normal allele.
3. an edible material used in the formulation of processed feeds. The carrier is used to absorb or attach other ingredients by impregnation or coating so that they are evenly mixed throughout the feed.

carrier detection
in genetic terms the detection of a heterozygote which carries the gene which is under investigation.
carrier effect
use of a hapten conjugated to a carrier protein in a primary immune response will result in a secondary immune response to the same combination, but not to the hapten alone or in association with a different carrier protein.
carrier register
in genetic terms is a list of all the animals which have produced an affected offspring.
carrier state
the state of being a carrier of an infectious disease or of a genetic defect.
carrier test herd
a herd consisting entirely of known carriers of a gene which is under investigation; a definition which could be extended to include a herd comprising only individuals known to carry a specific infectious agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 5: FSD-HSO algorithm applied to demodulate synthetic and real interferograms: (a) normalized interferograms; (b) direct phases of interferograms; (c-d) calculated frequencies along (x, y) axis, respectively; (e) demodulated phases with ambiguity errors; and (f) correct demodulated phases without ambiguity error.
Both the symbol-clock frequency and phase (or timing) must be correct in the receiver in order to demodulate the bits successfully and recover the transmitted information.
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The mobile phone (equipped with a microphone) then detects and receives the transmission, demodulates and decodes the data and transfers it to the attacker via mobile based communication including SMS, mobile data, wifi etc, as described by the paper.
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In September 2007, DOCOMO developed a trial LSI chip that demodulates orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM[3] signals and detects MIMO signals transmitted from four antennas at a rate of 200 Mbps, and also consumes no more than 0.
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It demodulates the phase fluctuations of the device under test by using multiple techniques such as the quadrature phase locked low-noise reference source.