demodicosis


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Related to demodicosis: scabies, Demodex

demodicosis

(dem'ō-di-kō'sis),
Folliculitis is primary sign; usually localized around eyes, mouth, and face but may become generalized in distribution. In veterinary medicine, certain breeds of dogs and cats are predisposed to the more severe generalized disease; infestation is seen also associated with otitis externa. Generalized demodicosis may be combined with furnuculosis and deep pyoderma as the parasite induces immunosuppression in the host.
See also: Demodex.

de·mo·di·co·sis

(dem'ō-di-kō'sis)
Infestation by mites of the species Demodex, chiefly involving hair follicles and characterized by varying degrees of local inflammation and immune response.
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Primary demodicosis can take the form of pityriasis folliculorum, also known as spinulate demodicosis, papulopustular perioral, periauricular, or periorbital demodicosis, or a nodulocystic/ conglobate version.
Canine demodicosis is a type of mange that occurs when abnormally high numbers of mites called Demodex canis multiply on the skin.
Efficacy of weekly oral doramectin treatment in canine demodicosis. Veterinary Record., v.
En este estudio la prevalencia fue similar, encontrandose en un 44% en la poblacion total con indice de infestacion por Demodex Folicullorum mayor a 50%, sin embargo en nuestra poblacion fue mas prevalente la demodicosis en hombres que en mujeres.
The ABCB1-1A mutation is not responsible for subchronic neurotoxicity seen in dogs of noncollie breeds following macrocyclic lactone treatment for generalized demodicosis. Vet Dermatol 2008; 20(1):60-66.
Dogs with juvenile-onset demodicosis shouldn't be bred to prevent passing the tendency to puppies.
Based on her presentation-blepharitis with cylindrical dandruff, refractory to medical trials with standard agents, and a history of sleeping next to her dogs, a presumptive diagnosis of blepharitis due to ocular demodicosis (infestation with the mite demodex follicularum) was made.
Observation of parasitic skin diseases demonstrated a high frequency of canine demodicosis, diagnosed by the presence of perifolliculitis, mural folliculitis and follicle rupture, besides the presence of the parasite, in agreement with literature reports (1).
* Rosacealike demodicosis. This skin eruption looks like rosacea but is thought to be aggravated by the Demodex mite.
Papulopustular rosacea (PPR) and rosacea-like demodicosis may be the same disease, according to the authors of a retrospective study.