demineralization


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demineralization

 [de-min″er-al-ĭ-za´shun]
excessive elimination of mineral or organic salts from the tissues of the body.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·min·er·al·i·za·tion

(dē-min'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn),
A loss or decrease of the mineral constituents of the body or individual tissues, especially of bone.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

demineralization

(dē-mĭn′ər-ə-lĭ-zā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of removing minerals or mineral salts from a liquid, such as water.
2. The loss, deprivation, or removal of minerals or mineral salts from the body, especially through disease, as the loss of calcium from bones or teeth.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

de·min·er·al·i·za·tion

(dē-min'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
A loss or decrease of the mineral constituents of the body or individual tissues, especially of bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Demineralization

A loss or decrease of minerals in the bones.
Mentioned in: Hyperparathyroidism
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·min·er·al·i·za·tion

(dē-min'ĕr-ăl-ī-zā'shŭn)
Loss or decrease of mineral constituents of body or individual tissues, especially bone.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The experimental orthodontic adhesive containing 20% TAT and 5% PIG-Nb was effective in preventing demineralization around metallic brackets bonded to enamel surface (p < 0.05) after 7 and 14 days (Figure 5a and 5b; Table 2) compared to TXT and 0% TAT groups.
According to the most researchers, toothpastes involving similar dose fluoride (500-1000 ppm) provide approximately same effect on demineralization; but 500 ppm and below fluoride concentrations are accepted as minimum dose and have minimal effect on demineralization (14,15).
Loss of calcium and phosphate ions are mainly involved in the process of demineralization and their loss can be restored by using non-invasive calcium phosphate delivery system.
It is interesting to note, reviewing published studies, that different species of shrimp among the aforementioned saltwater species (Parapenaeus longirostris, Metapeneaus monoceros, Penaeus vannamei) exhibit different contents of ash (18 to 46%), proteins (25 to 41%) and chitin (25 to 27%), which along with the acidification and protease production ability the bacteria used can lead to different results in terms of demineralization, deproteination and final yield.
Moreover, a clear spherical enamel crystal structure can be identified, indicating the demineralization effects on the tooth enamel surface from the cold-light bleaching treatment.
Demineralization solution in the form of acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) is made with the concentration of one molar each.
Clinically, demineralization occurs, with erosion of tooth surfaces and caries being evident.
Do you recommend the use of fluoride rinses when the demineralization is seen developing?
Besides providing optimum oral hygiene, the risk of enamel demineralization can be prevented or reduced with various conventional methods including the application of remineralizing agents and different forms of fluoride treatments as well as contemporary treatments like laser irradiation.
At the HFA concentration as low as 5 and 10%, demineralization of Al- and Fe-containing inorganic minerals takes place.
A modified pH cycling model to evaluate fluoride effect on enamel demineralization. Brazilian Oral Research 2003; 17:241-246.