deme

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deme

(dēm),
A local, small, highly inbred group or kinship. Compare: isolate.
[G. dēmos, people]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deme

(dēm)
n.
1. One of the townships of ancient Attica.
2. Ecology A local, usually stable population of interbreeding organisms of the same species.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

deme

or

local population

a group of individuals within a species that is largely isolated genetically from other individuals of the species, with clearly definable genetical, cytological and other characteristics.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Zamia fairchildiana patches of individuals or demes can also persist in degraded forests affected by selective logging and other human activities, where environmental conditions in the understory differ substantially from the ones in their native habitat.
Fundamentally, the reader is shown, as a result of Forbig and Demes' thorough analysis that civil society or evolution in cultural norms cannot be understood so rigidly as to expect them to bring about electoral change and 'reclaim' democracy.
Demes manages pools of pallets, layer pads and other packaging assets efficiently to produce savings of up to 30 percent when compared with traditional pallet rental solutions.
No discussion of Attic deme boundaries, even the single common boundary of two inner urban demes, can ignore the ongoing debate as to whether the fundamental political units of the Kleisthenic constitution were, simply put, territories separated from one another by boundaries (the "artificial" model), or only borderless administrative units (the "natural" model).
No member could be re-elected until all eligible citizens in his demes had served.
Three demes deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (Table 2), which is expected by chance alone because of the large number of estimates (3/42 = 0.07).
A fixed number of n local demes is considered, which are connected by migration.
Mikalson, |Religion in the Attic Demes', AJP 98 (1977), 424-35.
Taking the natural divisions of the demes as the basis for the Athenian state, he divided the country into three regions: the city, the coast, and the inland area.
Rapak, manufacturer of bag-in-box and filling systems and Demes Logistics, which specialises in packaging logistics and pool management have combined their expertise to create an innovative returnable system which delivers high efficiency gains for their customers.