demeanor

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Related to demeanors: comportment

demeanor

behavior towards others; body language.
References in classic literature ?
Casting off at once the grave and austere demeanor of an Indian chief, Chingachgook commenced speaking to his son in the soft and playful tones of affection.
He went hastily down, and was followed by a dignified person, dressed in a purple velvet suit with very rich embroidery; his demeanor would have possessed much stateliness, only that a grievous fit of the gout compelled him to hobble from stair to stair, with contortions of face and body.
This companion, who was addressed as Mary, and whose family name was Warren, had none of the uneasiness of demeanor that belonged to her friend, and obviously cared less what others thought of every thing she said or did.
His demeanor was dogged in the extreme, and "dat deuced bug" were the sole words which escaped his lips during the journey.
After saluting the Judge and his daughter, he took the chair to which Marmaduke pointed, and sat for a minute, composing his straight black hair, with a gravity of demeanor that was in tended to do honor to his official station.
But Monk, with his austere look and icy demeanor, appeared to ask of his eager lieutenants and delighted soldiers the cause of all this joy.
They were unarmed, their aspect and demeanor friendly, and they held up otter-skins, and made signs indicative of a wish to trade.
By the aspect and demeanor of these persons it was easy to judge that the feelings of the community had undergone a very favorable change in reference to the celestial pilgrimage.
By far the greater number of those who went by had a satisfied business-like demeanor, and seemed to be thinking only of making their way through the press.
He heard me to the end -- at first laughed heartily -- and then lapsed into an excessively grave demeanor, as if my insanity was a thing beyond suspicion.
We stirred him up occasionally, but he only unclosed an eye and slowly closed it again, abating no jot of his stately piety of demeanor or his tremendous seriousness.
Scott is praised for the fidelity with which he painted the demeanor and conversation of the superior classes.