delusional parasitosis


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Related to delusional parasitosis: Morgellons
A condition defined as a distressing need or urge to move the legs (or arms)—akathisia—usually accompanied by an uncomfortable deep-seated sensation in the legs that is brought on by rest—sitting or lying down, relieved by moving or walking, and worse at night or in the evening. RLS may be accompanied by involuntary limb movements while the patient is asleep
Management For nightly symptoms, dopaminergics are the agents of first choice, opiates second choice; for pain, gabapentin, opiates, dopaminergics, then sedative-hypnotics

delusional parasitosis

The psychotic obsession or belief that one is infested with insects or parasites.
See also: parasitosis
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(4) In a retrospective study of 147 patients with delusional parasitosis, 33% of these patients described themselves as disabled, 28% were retired, and 26% were employed.
L, it was initially estimated that it would take at least 2 weeks for the delusional parasitosis to significantly respond to antipsychotic therapy.
Antipsychotic treatment of primary delusional parasitosis. British Journal of Psychiatry, 191, 198-205.
Atypical anti-psychotics in delusional parasitosis: a retrospective case series of 20 patients.
Successful freabment with pimozide of delusional parasitosis. Br J Dermatol 1978; 98: 457-459.
The position of delusional parasitosis in psychiatric nosology and classification.
Delusional parasitosis and the dopamine transporter.
(3) Olanzapine has received attention in the Archives of Dermatology on multiple occasions, with most patients responding to a 20 mg schizophrenia dosage; however, case reports exist of positive results in delusional parasitosis at dosages of 1.25 mg.
New to the second edition is a chapter on the social and cultural factors which allow these treatable diseases to continue to occur on a large scale, as well as new chapters on distinguishing tropical infectious disease from bioterrorism; migrant, immigrant, and refugee health; delusional parasitosis; Nipah and Hendra viral infections, and tropical infectious disease concerns in pregnancy.
An audience poll showed that respondents were divided as to whether patients presenting with delusional infestation, also known as delusional parasitosis, should be confronted, referred to a psychiatrist, treated with an antipsychotic, or approached in some other way.
Literature on psychiatric treatment is limited, but SSRIs, lithium, benzodiazepines, and atypical antipsychotics (for delusional parasitosis) may be effective.