delusion


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delusion

 [dĕ-loo´zhun]
a false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof to the contrary and in spite of the fact that other members of the culture do not share the belief. adj., adj delu´sional.
bizarre delusion one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.
delusion of control the delusion that one's thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one's own but are being imposed by someone else or some other external force.
depressive delusion a delusion that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood, such as a delusion of serious illness, poverty, or spousal infidelity.
erotomanic delusion a delusional conviction that some other person, usually of higher status and often famous, is in love with the individual; it is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
fragmentary d's unconnected delusions not organized around a coherent theme.
delusion of grandeur (grandiose delusion) delusional conviction of one's own importance, power, or knowledge, or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of jealousy a delusional belief that one's spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence and often resulting in confrontation with the accused. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
mixed delusion one in which no central theme predominates. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of negation (nihilistic delusion) a depressive delusion that the self, part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.
paranoid d's an older term for delusion of grandeur and delusion of persecution; its use is discouraged.
delusion of persecution a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, cheated, persecuted, or conspired against. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
delusion of reference a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.
somatic delusion a delusion that there is some alteration in a bodily organ or its function. It is one of the subtypes of delusional disorder.
systematized d's a group of delusions organized around a common theme; typical of delusional disorders or paranoid schizophrenia.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn), Do not confuse this word with hallucination or illusion.
A false belief or wrong judgment, sometimes associated with hallucinations, held with conviction despite evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion

/de·lu·sion/ (dĕ-loo´zhun) an idiosyncratic false belief that is firmly maintained in spite of incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary.delu´sional
bizarre delusion  one that is patently absurd, with no possible basis in fact.
delusion of control  the delusion that one's thoughts, feelings, and actions are not one's own but are being imposed by someone else or other external force.
depressive delusion  one that is congruent with a predominant depressed mood.
erotomanic delusion  one associated with erotomania.
delusion of grandeur , grandiose delusion delusional conviction of one's own importance, power, or knowledge or that one is, or has a special relationship with, a deity or a famous person.
delusion of jealousy  a delusional belief that one's spouse or lover is unfaithful, based on erroneous inferences drawn from innocent events imagined to be evidence.
mixed delusion  one in which no central theme predominates.
delusion of negation , nihilistic delusion a depressive delusion that the self or part of the self, part of the body, other persons, or the whole world has ceased to exist.
delusion of persecution  a delusion that one is being attacked, harassed, persecuted, cheated, or conspired against.
delusion of reference  a delusional conviction that ordinary events, objects, or behaviors of others have particular and unusual meanings specifically for oneself.
systematized delusions  a group of delusions organized around a common theme.

delusion

(dĭ-lo͞o′zhən)
n.
a. A false belief or opinion: labored under the delusion that success was at hand.
b. Psychiatry A false belief or perception that is a manifestation of a mental illness: delusions of persecution.

de·lu′sion·al adj.

delusion

[dilo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, deludere, to deceive
a persistent aberrant belief or perception held inviolable by a person despite evidence that refutes it. Kinds of delusion include delusion of being controlled, delusion of grandeur, delusion of persecution, nihilistic delusion, paranoid delusion, and somatic delusion. Compare illusion.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn)
A false belief or wrong judgment held with conviction despite incontrovertible evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion

A fixed belief, unassailable by reason, in something manifestly absurd or untrue. Psychotic delusions include delusions of persecution, of grandeur, of disease, of abnormality of body shape, of unworthiness, of unreality and of being malignly influenced by others.

Delusion

A false belief that is resistant to reason or contrary to actual fact. Common delusions include delusions of persecution, delusions about one s importance (sometimes called delusions of grandeur), or delusions of being controlled by others. In BDD, the delusion is related to the patient's perception of his or her body.

de·lu·sion

(dĕ-lū'zhŭn) Do not confuse this word with hallucination or illusion.
A false belief or wrong judgment, sometimes associated with hallucinations, held with conviction despite evidence to the contrary.
[L. de-ludo, pp. -lusus, to play false, deceive, fr. ludo, to play]

delusion,

n a persistent, aberrant belief or perception held inviolable by a person despite evidence to the contrary.

Patient discussion about delusion

Q. Give life to her please! Here is a really confusing question to you all. But your reply is a life for her. I know someone who is bipolar and she thinks that her ‘brother’ sexually molested her when they were kids. Can this be a delusion? Or hallucinating?

A. Im going to answer this question a little different;What if she is telling the truth,and her brother is planning on no body believing her? because she has this disease?---keep that in mind when you take her to the DR--mrfoot56

More discussions about delusion
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning theory supports the view that the father eventually learned to adopt the delusions from the more domineering patient.
This case is described to bring to the fore an interesting presentation with a primary delusion, which is rare in the clinical settings, especially in the backdrop of the general elections.
Othello syndrome occurs most frequently with neurological disorders, and the delusions appear to be associated with dysfunction of the frontal lobes, especially in the right frontal lobe where lesions have been reported more frequently than in the left.
delusion of sexual transformation (one has changed to the opposite sex)
The main delusion involved in the syndrome, the negation one, stands out in the condition.
26) Incapacity and insane delusions are especially at risk for improper blending when an irrational delusion interferes with an individual's ability to satisfy one or more of the requisites of testamentary capacity; where, for example, the individual is of limited financial means yet irrationally clings to the belief that he owns the Empire State Building.
She had her first manic episode when she was 23 yrs, and had grandiose delusion of being the first woman chosen to save the world.
Our country remains a special case -- in fact a basket case -- but it has learned nothing from what it has gone through because one of the main delusions of our rulers is that they are infallible and therefore make the same mistakes over and over again.
In these cases, any destabilization of the delusion might lead once again to distress and fear associated with anomalous perceptual experiences.
After all - it's meaning and connection that drive any good mystery and keep readers involved in the overall 'whodunnit'; and in this The Fregoli Delusion excels.
Over the years, I have made peace with the ignorance and audacity of the average American, but hearing such drivel from the mouth of an individual who, supposedly by his position and title, must be better informed than the average guy in the street, made me realise delusions are a universal part of the human psyche.
So-called "Truman Show delusion" (referring to a 1998 Jim Carrey film) is a type of persecutory/grandiose delusion in which patients believe their lives are staged plays or reality television shows.