deletion

(redirected from deleting)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

deletion

 [de-le´shun]
in genetics, loss of genetic material from a chromosome.
 Examples of large-scale chromosomal deletions: A, terminal; B, interstitial. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·le·tion

(dĕ-lē'shŭn),
In genetics, any spontaneous elimination of part of the normal genetic complement, whether cytogenetically visible (chromosomal deletion) or found by molecular techniques.
[L. deletio, destruction]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

deletion

(dĭ-lē′shən)
n.
1. The act of deleting; removal by striking out.
2. Material, such as a word or passage, that has been removed from a body of written or printed matter.
3. Genetics The loss, as through mutation, of one or more nucleotides from a chromosome.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

de·le·tion

(dĕ-lē'shŭn)
genetics Any spontaneous elimination of part of the normal genetic complement, whether cytogenetically visible (chromosomal deletion) or inferred from phenotypic evidence (point deletion).
[L. deletio, destruction]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

deletion

In genetics, the removal of a segment of DNA with joining up of the cut ends. as in the loss of a segment of a chromosome. Deletion of a single BASE PAIR is one of the kinds of point mutation. Deletion of a base pair triplet (codon) will result in a protein with a missing amino acid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Deletion

The absence of genetic material that is normally found in a chromosome. Often, the genetic material is missing due to an error in replication of an egg or sperm cell.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "This is clearly a very large amount of information for any organisation to be deleting, without any public scrutiny.
Denham also found that Premier Christy Clark's deputy chief of staff, Michele Cadario, was bulk deleting her e-mails on a daily basis.
To have 14.45m of those deleting emails may not seem to pose a great problem but email traffic is growing at a rate of about six or seven per cent a year.
The operating system keeps track of all this in a file allocation table (FAT), but when you delete a file, you are only deleting the entry in the FAT.
Though often offensive and generally stupid, spam is relatively easy to identify, and deleting it can be done while sipping coffee, gazing out the window or making routine phone calls.
Of course, your best solution is to do all your deleting through the Recycle Bin, and think twice before you empty it.
Deleting large chunks of one chromosome does not generally kill the offspring, says Bradley, because the second copy usually contains a spare of each missing gene.
Summary: Washington [USA], February 16 (ANI): If you thought deleting your messages years ago meant no history or trace of them on Twitter then you have been proven wrong.
The Verge's guide to deleting your tweets has a good rundown of free and non-free services you can use to clear up your old tweets.
And until this feature is ready, we will no longer be deleting any executives' messages.
We are deleting them and apologize for the inconvenience.
"Deleting messages for everyone allows the user to delete specific messages that they have sent to either a group or an individual chat.